Memorial University of Newfoundland

As Newfoundland and Labrador’s only university, Memorial has a special obligation to the people of this province. Established as a memorial to the Newfoundlanders who lost their lives on active service during the First and Second World Wars, Memorial University draws inspiration from these shattering sacrifices of the past as we help to build a better future for our province, our country and our world.

We are a multi-campus, multi-disciplinary, public, teaching/research university committed to excellence in everything we do. We strive to have national and global impact, while fulfilling our social mandate to provide access to university education for the people of the province and to contribute to the social, cultural, scientific and economic development of Newfoundland and Labrador and beyond.

The Memorial experience goes beyond academics; it invites a discovery of self, community and place. At Memorial, we celebrate our unique identity through the stories of our people – the work of scholars and educators, the ingenuity of students, the achievements of alumni – and the impact we collectively make in the province, the country and the world. Memorial is the natural place where people and ideas become.

Memorial University has more than 18,500 students and 5,200 faculty and staff spread across four campuses and nearly 85,000 alumni active throughout the world. From local endeavors to research projects of national concern, Memorial’s impact is felt far and wide.

Links

Displaying all articles

Ovidie is a French feminist who published a book about the ignorance of pornography. Her documentary Pornocracy is an exploration of porn’s multinational corporations and their exploitation of performers. (Courtesy of Pornocracy)

Porn not to blame for public health issues

Both the U.S. and the U.K. have blamed porn for a wide range of medical and social ailments. But a recent Canadian report suggests there's no credible evidence of this co-relation.
A recent Canadian trial reports breast cancer over-diagnosis rates of up to 55 per cent, from routine screening mammograms. (Shutterstock)

Routine mammograms do not save lives: The research is clear

October is breast cancer awareness month. Women should know there is no reliable evidence that routine mammograms reduce death from breast cancer, and there's good evidence that they cause harm.
In 2014 and 2015, about 35 per cent of aid committed by OECD donors addressed gender in some way. (Shutterstock)

How to spend foreign aid like a feminist

Canada is making a major commitment to foreign aid that will help girls and women. But will its new aid policy have the unintended consequence of shutting doors to other much-needed aid?
Agbogbloshie, an area in the city of Accra Ghana, is usually portrayed as an e-waste dump. A more accurate picture would include the repair and refurbishment economy. Agbogbloshie Makerspace Platform

Beyond recycling: solving e-waste problems must include designers and consumers

Design-for-recycling and take-back laws – not just more recycling – are needed to address the sprawling e-waste problem.

Research and Expert Database

Authors

More Authors