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Memorial University of Newfoundland

As Newfoundland and Labrador’s only university, Memorial has a special obligation to the people of this province. Established as a memorial to the Newfoundlanders who lost their lives on active service during the First and Second World Wars, Memorial University draws inspiration from these shattering sacrifices of the past as we help to build a better future for our province, our country and our world.

We are a multi-campus, multi-disciplinary, public, teaching/research university committed to excellence in everything we do. We strive to have national and global impact, while fulfilling our social mandate to provide access to university education for the people of the province and to contribute to the social, cultural, scientific and economic development of Newfoundland and Labrador and beyond.

The Memorial experience goes beyond academics; it invites a discovery of self, community and place. At Memorial, we celebrate our unique identity through the stories of our people – the work of scholars and educators, the ingenuity of students, the achievements of alumni – and the impact we collectively make in the province, the country and the world. Memorial is the natural place where people and ideas become.

Memorial University has more than 18,500 students and 5,200 faculty and staff spread across four campuses and nearly 85,000 alumni active throughout the world. From local endeavors to research projects of national concern, Memorial’s impact is felt far and wide.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 39 articles

La vue par le hublot d’un avion faisant le trajet Vancouver-Calgary en juin 2020. La Presse Canadienne/Jonathan Hayward

L’annulation de vols régionaux d’Air Canada affaiblit les communautés éloignées. Il faut repenser le transport régional

Une catastrophe menace les communautés éloignées après qu’Air Canada a annulé 30 liaisons régionales. Elle menace les droits de tous les Canadiens à être connectés au système de transport national.
The view out the window during a flight from Vancouver to Calgary in June 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Air Canada’s cancellation of regional flights will gut remote communities

A disaster is looming for remote Canadian communities after Air Canada cancelled 30 regional routes. It threatens the rights of all Canadians to be connected to the national transportation system.
Distinguishing a unique sense of place within a common virtual space of online learning will require significant investment. (Shutterstock)

6 ways universities are being put to the test by coronavirus

In a world where students can attend any university from their living rooms, universities need a compelling answer to the question: “Why should students come here?”
A woman observes social distancing guidelines as she rides the subway in Moscow, Russia. President Vladimir Putin has been accused of suppressing the number of deaths from COVID-19. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

The politics behind how governments control coronavirus data

The coronavirus has affected almost every country in the world, but there are major differences in how health data is being reported. Politics often dictates how the data is shared.
People gather on the rocks outside the famous Fogo Island Inn, part of a social enterprise aimed at helping local communities hit hard by the collapse of the cod industry. (Alex Fradkin, courtesy of Shorefast/Fogo Island Inn)

Fogo Island shows how social enterprises can help rebuild communities post-coronavirus

Social enterprises like the one in Fogo Island, N.L., offer hope in a world turned upside down by the current pandemic.
A woman takes a selfie with three others while attending the Vaisakhi Parade in Surrey, B.C., on April 22, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Punjabi ideas of honour can lead to girl-shaming and prenatal sex selection

Studies suggest a significant proportion of Indian-origin families in Canada are practising female feticide. It is crucial to understand how gender inequality may lead to sex selection.
If countries commit to universal health coverage alone, they will be emphasizing disease management over investing in wellness. (Shutterstock)

Universal health coverage alone won’t radically improve global health

The UN's global health policy related to universal health coverage should be grounded in primary health care -- with meaningful benchmarks to ensure patient participation.
A wildfire moves towards the town of Anzac from Fort McMurray, Alta. in May 2016. Jason Franson/The Canadian Press via AP

More frequent fires could dramatically alter boreal forests and emit more carbon

The boreal forest is being reshaped by wildfire. As climate change intensifies wildfire activity, the boreal forest will likely become a carbon source.
Teaching social and environmental responsibility to engineering students will provide them with valuable skills required for the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Shutterstock

Teaching technological stewardship makes future engineers more agile and responsible

Technological stewardship is a set of values that provide members of the engineering community with guidance for responsible, responsive and agile approaches to design and implementation.
Social and cognitive skills such as drawing conclusions about emotional states and social interactions are least vulnerable to being displaced by AI. (Shutterstock)

How to prepare students for the rise of artificial intelligence in the workforce

A shift to outcomes-based education will enable students to gain critical automation-resistant competencies to succeed and thrive in the future workforce alongside AI.
Early intervention could make a difference. Here, protestors gather at Queen’s Park in Toronto on March 7, 2019 to protest changes to Ontario’s autism program. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

I’m an ‘Autism Mom.’ Here’s why Ontario is choosing the wrong path

An inclusive education researcher says the government's consolation plan to boost school funding for autism services with no investment in early childhood education flies in the face of evidence.
The United Nations says people “left behind” include those vulnerable to the effects of climate change, but aren’t the furthest behind those damaging the environment? Here, a man rides a bicycle through a devastated Homs, Syria. Numerous studies say climate change was a factor in record-setting drought, one of several causes of the country’s civil war. AP Photo/Dusan Vranic

‘Leaving no one behind’ conveys a paternalistic approach to development

The United Nations Declaration on sustainable development stresses "leaving no-one behind," but what about the factors that cause many to be behind in the first place?

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