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Memorial University of Newfoundland

As Newfoundland and Labrador’s only university, Memorial has a special obligation to the people of this province. Established as a memorial to the Newfoundlanders who lost their lives on active service during the First and Second World Wars, Memorial University draws inspiration from these shattering sacrifices of the past as we help to build a better future for our province, our country and our world.

We are a multi-campus, multi-disciplinary, public, teaching/research university committed to excellence in everything we do. We strive to have national and global impact, while fulfilling our social mandate to provide access to university education for the people of the province and to contribute to the social, cultural, scientific and economic development of Newfoundland and Labrador and beyond.

The Memorial experience goes beyond academics; it invites a discovery of self, community and place. At Memorial, we celebrate our unique identity through the stories of our people – the work of scholars and educators, the ingenuity of students, the achievements of alumni – and the impact we collectively make in the province, the country and the world. Memorial is the natural place where people and ideas become.

Memorial University has more than 18,500 students and 5,200 faculty and staff spread across four campuses and nearly 85,000 alumni active throughout the world. From local endeavors to research projects of national concern, Memorial’s impact is felt far and wide.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 86 articles

In-depth interviews with former youth in care described barriers and challenges to attending post-secondary education once they received a tuition waiver. (Shutterstock)

Health of former youth in care could be bolstered by stronger tuition waiver programs

To understand how tuition waivers and associated supports can help former youth in care complete post-secondary education and positively affect their health, evidence-based practices are needed.
George River Caribou outside of Nain, Nunatsiavut, Labrador. (David Borish)

What the declining caribou populations — and total hunting ban — mean for Inuit communities in Labrador

Support for Inuit and other Indigenous-led strategies for conservation and community well-being must be prioritized.
One child constructed a city out of cardboard boxes from his recent move to Canada. He shared this with classmates, free from the language barrier that made in-person school a struggle. (Shutterstock)

How some children prospered in pandemic online learning

Researchers studying ways to foster children’s inclusion in society worked with teachers to adapt classroom practices, like dedicated dialogue circles, to online learning.
People gather outside Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland’s office in Toronto for a rally led by current and former international students calling for changes to immigration rules during COVID-19 in September 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Tijana Martin

Canada is foolish to snub international graduate students and scholars

International students are not only ideal candidates for settlement in Canada, they’re also vital to our prosperity. So why is it so difficult for them to come to Canada, especially those from Africa?
Two-eared listening is a critical element for Western advocates of restorative justice. (Shutterstock)

Two-eared listening is essential for understanding restorative justice in Canada

Two-eared listening is based on the idea of learning and understanding, a willingness to be suspend judgement and the desire to communicate respectfully.
Russian President Vladimir Putin listens to Russia’s commissioner for entrepreneurs’ rights during a meeting in the Kremlin in Moscow on May 26, 2022. (Mikhail Metzel, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

Russian roulette in Ukraine: Is Vladimir Putin powerful, or just lucky?

Russia’s war in Ukraine calls for drawing a line between power and luck. Putin, who was widely considered among the most powerful people in the world, may have been simply lucky.
While licensed retailers are subject to inspections and constrained to selling products sourced through licensed channels, the unlicensed market seems to operate outside these requirements, with little pressure from law enforcement. (Shutterstock)

Canada needs better CBD policies to protect consumers from unlicensed products

Policy-makers and stakeholders in Canada should re-examine CBD policies and ensure they are protecting, rather than confusing, consumers.
Marine ecosystems across Canada’s coasts, such as eelgrass meadows that provide an important habitat for juvenile species, are threatened by human activities and climate change. (Nicolas Winkler)

Canada’s marine conservation toolbox needs an overhaul to counter climate change

It is time to acknowledge and address the rapid shifts in Canada’s oceans. To meet this challenge, Canada’s marine conservation toolbox — starting with the Oceans Act — needs an overhaul.
Cars drive past a building with a huge letter Z, a symbol of the Russian military, and a hashtag reading ‘we don’t abandon our own’ in Moscow on March 30, 2022. (AP Photo)

War-time media reporting is shaping opinions about Russia’s Ukraine invasion

The transmission of truth about the war against Ukraine is a criminal offense in Russia. Without access to the complete information about the war, Russian population continues to support it.
Russian President Vladimir Putin watches through binoculars as Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu sits nearby during military exercises east of Moscow in September 2021. (Sergei Savostyanov, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

Why Vladimir Putin is botching his Ukrainian invasion

As Russia’s war against Ukraine unfolds, Putin’s errors become perceptible. That’s because he’s faced few constraints to his power.
A mother and son watch as firefighters battle wildfires in Shoresh, on the outskirts of Jerusalem, on Aug. 16, 2021. (AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)

Rapidly increasing climate change poses a rising threat to mental health, says IPCC

For the first time, an IPCC climate report has assessed evidence that weather and climate extremes are already affecting mental health — and are likely to worsen.
Ukrainian soldiers take positions in downtown Kyiv, Ukraine, on Feb. 25, 2022 after Russia pressed its invasion of Ukraine to the outskirts of the capital. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

Would Vladimir Putin actually be able to rule Ukraine?

Even if Vladimir Putin wins in Ukraine, he won’t be able to govern Ukrainians as he pleases. That’s because power is perceived very differently by Russians and Ukrainians.
Response teams often make assumptions about the way oil behaves in the ocean, but this means oil plumes can go undetected and get missed in the clean-up. (Shutterstock)

How autonomous underwater robots can spot oil plumes after an ocean spill

Clean-up operations after a spill can miss large quantities of the oil, with severe risks for marine habitats, fish and birds.
Cannabis use negatively affects performance on driving-related cognitive tasks. (Shutterstock)

Cannabis-impaired driving: Here’s what we know about the risks of weed behind the wheel

Cannabis use doubles the risk of a fatal or serious-injury car crash, but some people believe it’s safer than alcohol-impaired driving. Here’s what you need to know about cannabis behind the wheel.

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