Michigan State University

Michigan State University Spartans work to advance the common good in uncommon ways. The nation’s pioneer land-grant university, MSU began as a bold experiment that democratised higher education and helped bring science and innovation into everyday life. Today, MSU is one of the top research universities in the world - on one of the biggest, greenest campuses in the nation - and is home to a diverse community of dedicated students and scholars, athletes and artists, scientists and leaders.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 194 articles

Interested in a juicy burger grown in the lab? Oliver Sjöström/Unsplash

Would you eat ‘meat’ from a lab? Consumers aren’t necessarily sold on ‘cultured meat’

Cultured meat comes from cells in a lab, not muscles in an animal. While regulatory and technological aspects are being worked out, less is known about whether people are up for eating this stuff.
Protesters on the University of Cincinnati campus. AP Photo/John Minchillo

A new look at racial disparities in police use of deadly force

Does it make sense to compare the percentage of black Americans shot by police to the percentage of black Americans in the population? A new analysis suggests a different way of looking at the data.
Purse seiner fishing in the Indian Ocean. Footprint estimates do not assess how sustainably resources such as fisheries are managed. Jiri Rezac

Yes, humans are depleting Earth’s resources, but ‘footprint’ estimates don’t tell the full story

August 1, 2018 is 'Earth Overshoot Day,' a date coined by the nonprofit Global Footprint Network to publicize overuse of Earth's resources. But their estimates actually understate the problem.
In this file photo taken on on Oct. 4, 1987, a Soviet army officer presents ammunition rigged with chemical agents during a visit by Western diplomats and journalists to a chemical weapons research facility in Shikhany, Saratov region, Russia. The facility in Shikhany led the efforts to develop Soviet chemical weapons, including Novichok-class nerve agents. John Thor Dahlburg/ AP Photo

What is Novichok? A neurotoxicologist explains

Novichok are a set of molecules that are some of the most deadly nerve agents ever developed. They are almost impossible to detect and clean up.
Guitarist David Hinds at Reggae on the Rocks in Denver, Colorado. Photo by Rick Scuteri/Invision/AP

Reggae’s sacred roots and call to protest injustice

Reggae is the musical expression of Rastafari, a belief system of migrants to Jamaica. A popular song, 'Rivers of Babylon,' offers a window into their spirituality and longing for their homeland.
Gun safety advocates hold signs during a rally to honor victims of gun violence on the steps of the Colorado State Capitol in Denver, 2013. AP/Brennan Linsley

More mental health care alone will not stop gun violence

After mass killings, politicians feel compelled to offer solutions to gun violence. One of the most common answers is better access to mental health care, but research has found that's not effective.
Pigs and humans have a lot in common, particularly their digestive tracts. Krumanop/Shutterstock.com

Stress is bad for your body, but how? Studying piglets may shed light

Stress makes people tired and irritable, but its dangers to the body do not stop there. Chemicals that were meant to work under an immediate threat harm organs in the body and can elevate blood pressure.
Peer rejection is common among school shooters, but does that explain their actions? Sabphoto/www.shutterstock.om

Peer rejection isn’t the culprit behind school shootings

While many school shooters suffered peer rejection of some sort, research doesn't support the idea that peer rejection is the culprit behind shootings, a scholar argues.
Immigrants and inspectors in the registry room for legal inspections at Ellis Island.

Jewish Americans changed their names, but not at Ellis Island

Thousands of Jewish immigrants and their children changed their names in America – but not at Ellis Island. The reasons are complicated and part of the Jewish struggle with their identity in America.
Is someone else making money on your computer? WICHAI WONGJONGJAIHAN/Shutterstock.com

Cryptojacking spreads across the web

Enterprising cryptocurrency enthusiasts have found a way to use your computer processor and electricity to make themselves money. What is cryptojacking, and how does it work?
Members of the senior class of Russell County HIgh School in Kentucky recite the Lord’s Prayer, in defiance of a court ruling, during commencement exercises in 2006. AP Photo/James Crisp

History shows why school prayer is so divisive

As the Kentucky Senate considers a bill for school prayer, a scholar explains the violent history of prayer – and a time when Catholic students were sometimes whipped, beaten and worse for not participating.

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