Natural History Museum

The Natural History Museum first opened its doors on 18 April 1881. It is a world-class visitor attraction and leading science research centre.

We use our unique collections and unrivalled expertise to tackle the biggest challenges facing the world today.

We care for more than 80 million specimens spanning billions of years and welcome more than five million visitors annually.

Links

Displaying all articles

A modern arthropod (the centipede Cormocephalus) crawls over its Cambrian ‘flatmate’ (the trilobite Estaingia). Michael Lee / South Australian Museum and Flinders University

Life quickly finds a way: the surprisingly swift end to evolution’s big bang

Modern animals took over our planet much more quickly than previously thought. This has both welcome and disturbing implications for the future of life on our rapidly changing planet
A typical elephant shark from the Melbourne Aquarium. Wikimedia/Fir0002/Flagstaffotos

Avoiding Medusa’s gaze: what sharks can tell us about a rare human disease

Some things that develop as normal in elephant sharks and other marine life can mimic things we see in human disease. That makes these 'mutants' ideal for study to find out why things go wrong in humans.

Research and Expert Database

Authors

More Authors