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North Carolina State University

As a land-grant institution, NC State was born as an idea: that higher education should bring economic, societal and intellectual prosperity to the masses. From our origins teaching the agricultural and mechanical arts, we’ve grown to become a pre-eminent research enterprise that advances knowledge in science, technology, engineering, math, design, the humanities and social sciences, textiles and veterinary medicine.

Our students, faculty and staff take problems in hand and work with industry, government and nonprofit partners to solve them. Our 34,000-plus high-performing students apply what they learn in the real world, through research, internships, co-ops and world-changing service. That experiential education ensures they leave here with career-ready skills. And those skills come at a reasonable cost: NC State consistently rates as one of the best values in higher education.

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New research suggests that Venus’ crust is broken into large blocks – the dark reddish–purple areas – that are surrounded by belts of tectonic structures shown in lighter yellow–red. Paul K. Byrne/NASA/USGS

The surface of Venus is cracked and moves like ice floating on the ocean – likely due to tectonic activity

Researchers used decades-old radar data and found that some low-lying areas of Venus’ crust are moving and jostling. This evidence is some of the strongest yet of tectonic activity on Venus.
A big increase in use car prices drove the inflation rate higher in April. AP Photo/David Zalubowski

Why the inflation rate doesn’t tell the whole story – all it takes is a spike in a category like used cars to cause consumer prices to soar

The average price of US goods and services surged in April, leading some to worry the economy is beginning to experience dangerously high levels of inflation. A scholar explains why that’s unlikely.
Futures won’t affect whether there’s water in the hose. Bettmann/Getty Images

Why Wall Street investors’ trading California water futures is nothing to fear – and unlikely to work anyway

The world’s first futures market for water launched in California in December. Two commodities experts explain how it works, what the potential problems are and why there’s no reason to freak out.
Trump supporters clash with police and security forces as they storm the U.S. Capitol. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

How should schools teach kids about what happened at the US Capitol on Jan. 6? We asked 6 education experts

Teachers shouldn’t avoid this topic, no matter how uncomfortable it might make them to discuss it with children and teens.
Firefighting foam left after a fire in Pennsylvania. These foams often contain PFAS chemicals that can contaminate water supplies. Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images

PFAS ‘forever chemicals’ are widespread and threaten human health – here’s a strategy for protecting the public

PFAS chemicals are toxic, widespread and persistent in the environment, and the federal government has been slow to regulate them. A scientist explains why evaluating them one by one isn’t working.
Encouraging students at the University of Colorado, Boulder, to vote in the midterm elections, Nov. 6, 2018. Jason Connolly/AFP via Getty Images

Want the youth vote? Some college students are still up for grabs in November

Researchers examined the voting behavior of 5,762 students at 120 colleges and universities. Two groups stood out as an untapped electoral resource – if the candidates can turn out Gen Z.
New research aims to give phone companies tools to help curb robocalls. Peter Dazeley/The Image Bank via Getty Images

Does ignoring robocalls make them stop? Here’s what we learned from getting 1.5 million calls on 66,000 phone lines

The plague of unsolicited automated phone calls isn’t abating. By studying robocalls, scholars at the Robocall Observatory are developing ways to help shut them down.
Cylinder seal (left) and modern impression (right) showing two people drinking beer through long straws. Khafajeh, Iraq (Early Dynastic period, c. 2600–2350 B.C.). Courtesy of the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago

Brewing Mesopotamian beer brings a sip of this vibrant ancient drinking culture back to life

Beer was extremely popular in ancient Mesopotamia. Sipped through straws, it differed from today’s beer and was enjoyed by people from all walks of life.

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