Oregon State University

Oregon State is a leading research university located in one of the safest, smartest, greenest small cities in the nation. Situated 90 miles south of Portland, and an hour from the Cascades or the Pacific Coast, Corvallis is the perfect home base for exploring Oregon’s natural wonders.

Oregon State University has always been a place with a purpose — making a positive difference in quality of life, natural resources and economic prosperity in Oregon and beyond. Through discovery, innovation and application, we are meeting challenges, solving problems and turning ideas into reality.

Founded in 1868, Oregon State is the state’s Land Grant university and is one of only two universities in the U.S. to have Sea Grant, Space Grant and Sun Grant designations. Oregon State is also the only university in Oregon to hold both the Carnegie Foundation’s top designation for research institutions and its prestigious Community Engagement classification.

As Oregon’s leading public research university, with $281 million in external funding in the 2012 fiscal year, Oregon State’s impact reaches across the state and beyond. With 12 colleges, 15 Agricultural Experiment Stations, 35 county Extension offices, the Hatfield Marine Sciences Center in Newport and OSU-Cascades in Bend, Oregon State has a presence in every one of Oregon’s 36 counties, with a statewide economic footprint of $2.06 billion.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 27 articles

Most of the world’s wild horses, such as the Australian brumby, are outside their historic native range. Andrea Harvey

From feral camels to ‘cocaine hippos’, large animals are rewilding the world

Much of the Earth's megafauna are now found outside their native ranges. Thanks to introduced populations, megafauna richness on each continent is higher today than during the past ~10,000 years.
A brown bear snags a sockeye salmon in Alaska. In warm years, red elderberries ripen early and Kodiak bears leave streams full of salmon to eat them. Jonathan Armstrong

As a warming climate changes Kodiak bears’ diets, impacts could ripple through ecosystems

Climate change is making berries ripen early in Kodiak, Alaska, luring bears away from eating salmon. This shift may not hurt the bears, but could have far-reaching impacts on surrounding forests.
A glimpse behind bars. Cropped from krystiano/flickr

Private prisons, explained

The White House is pushing for more private prisons. But do the industry's promised benefits hold up to scrutiny?
Glaciers have been a major contributor to sea-level rise. Knut Christianson

What does the science really say about sea-level rise?

Could sea levels really rise by several metres this century. Probably not, although this century's greenhouse emissions could potentially set the stage for large rises in centuries to come.
Humpback whale populations have leapt on both Australia’s east and west coasts. Ari S. Friedlaender (under NMFS permit)

The big comeback: it’s time to declare victory for Australian humpback whale conservation

Chalk it up as a rare conservation win: humpback whales have bounced back so strongly since the whaling era that there is no longer a need to include them on Australia's official threatened species list.
Monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus. K. P. McFarlandVermont Center for Ecostudies, www.kpmcfarland.com

Why Monarch butterflies need a helping hand

An iconic North American migration is in jeopardy. The monarch butterfly migrates back and forth from Mexico to Canada every year, its orange and black sails peppering blue skies. In the past 20 years…
Young Steller sea lions in Prince William Sound, Alaska. NMFS Permit 14336. Markus Horning

Autopsies from space: who killed the sea lions?

A decade ago, we set out to unravel deep ocean crime scenes we weren’t even sure existed. The crime? Endangered Steller sea lions were rapidly disappearing in parts of Alaska. Their numbers dropped by…

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