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Oxford Brookes University

Oxford Brookes University is a public university in Oxford, England. It can trace its origins to 1865 when the former Oxford School of Art was established. In 1992 it became a university and was renamed to honour its former principal, John Henry Brookes. It is the second university in Oxford, along with the University of Oxford.

Oxford Brookes University has been named as one of the top 50 young universities in the world by the QS World University Rankings 2018 – and is the only UK university to make the list. The QS Top 50 Under 50 celebrates the world’s leading universities under 50 years old and includes institutions from 25 different countries. The university is divided into four faculties, Business, Health and Life Sciences, Humanities and Social Sciences, and Technology, Design and Environment.

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Displaying 21 - 36 of 36 articles

Has the sun set on China’s property boom? Tao Wu via Flickr

Why fears of a Chinese property crash are overblown

The Chinese property market that has powered the country’s rapid economic growth for a decade and a half has suffered a contraction. This seems to confirm a popular pessimistic outlook that China’s property…
A rarity. Nancy Rothwell, vice-chancellor of Manchester University, honoured by the Queen. Chris Jackson/PA

Only 17% of UK universities are run by women – why?

Women now form 56.5% of the student body, make up 53.8% of the whole workforce and occupy 45% of academic jobs in higher education in the United Kingdom. But their representation declines dramatically…
Bless ‘em. (That’s an order.) The Yorck Project

Modern day ‘Cinderella law’ has roots in Georgian Britain

A newly proposed “Cinderella law” seeks to make parents’ “emotional abuse” of their children a criminal offence in England and Wales. Under it, parents who deliberately ignore children, subject them to…
South Africa wants to tackle development challenges on its own terms. Julien Behal/PA

Why South Africa has ripped up foreign investment deals

Over the past few months, South Africa’s government has cancelled foreign investment treaties with Germany, Belgium and Luxembourg, Switzerland, Spain and the Netherlands. The reasoning behind this tells…
The proposed HS2 line near Altofts, south of Leeds: big changes, but who decides? HS2

HS2: how do we resolve megaproject planning?

The UK’s largest infrastructure projects of coming decades have been wrapped in controversy: the HS2 high-speed rail line linking London to the north is mired in political wrangling and disputed facts…
Flowers don’t please everyone. nathaninsandiego

Blooming flowers rang the death knell for many mammals

Hummingbird-pollinated flowers evolved perfectly to suit the bird’s bill shape, its colour vision and even its taste buds. This is the beauty of co-evolution, where two species interact so closely that…
Seamus Heaney up close with the local environment. Burns Library, Boston College

Seamus Heaney - the death of a naturalist

The sudden death on Friday of the Irish Nobel prize-winning poet Seamus Heaney has focused international minds and media on the power of poetry to affect our lives. This is especially true from an environmental…
A sliver of hope as forests learn to consume more CO2. Moyan Brenn

Forests less thirsty thanks to increasing carbon dioxide levels

Global warming is primarily driven by increasing emissions of greenhouse gases from human activities. Chief among these gases is carbon dioxide (CO2), which warms the planet by trapping heat that would…
Leading biologists argue the world must embrace GM plants. Will de Freitas

Hacking plant ‘blood vessels’ could avert food crisis

Today’s wars are not about food, but not too far in the future they could be. The number of people dying of starvation has been falling for decades, but the decline in the numbers of hungry people is slowing…

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