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Royal Roads University

Royal Roads University is a public university which provides an innovative model of post-secondary education. The university offers applied and professional programs that attract students and scholar-practitioners at the leading edge of 21st-century learning.

Its interdisciplinary learning and teaching approach focuses on preparing students with the knowledge, skills and competencies required to develop solutions to today’s complex problems.

Located on the traditional lands of the Xwsepsum (Esquimalt) and Lekwungen (Songhees) ancestors and families and on one of Canada’s most beautiful national historic sites, Royal Roads has a history of excellence in leadership and learning. With a balance of graduate, undergraduate and certificate programs, the university’s programs are designed with students in mind, whether a new student, working professional or lifelong learner.

Royal Roads’ blended delivery model combines short periods of intensive study with online courses, offering students a convenient way to pursue their education. The cohort learning model is a cornerstone of a Royal Roads education. Through group-based course work, peers share, challenge and grow with each other throughout their program.

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