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Royal Roads University

Royal Roads University is a public university which provides an innovative model of post-secondary education. The university offers applied and professional programs that attract students and scholar-practitioners at the leading edge of 21st-century learning.

Its interdisciplinary learning and teaching approach focuses on preparing students with the knowledge, skills and competencies required to develop solutions to today’s complex problems.

Located on the traditional lands of the Xwsepsum (Esquimalt) and Lekwungen (Songhees) ancestors and families and on one of Canada’s most beautiful national historic sites, Royal Roads has a history of excellence in leadership and learning. With a balance of graduate, undergraduate and certificate programs, the university’s programs are designed with students in mind, whether a new student, working professional or lifelong learner.

Royal Roads’ blended delivery model combines short periods of intensive study with online courses, offering students a convenient way to pursue their education. The cohort learning model is a cornerstone of a Royal Roads education. Through group-based course work, peers share, challenge and grow with each other throughout their program.

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Social spaces that bring together international and domestic students are an essential part of creating an open campus culture. (Shutterstock)

How universities can support international students beyond orientation week

Year-round academic and extracurricular opportunities that encourage cultural exchange between international students, their peers and the wider society are important.
Canadian Howie Mandel is a veteran stand up comic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Peter Power

Comedy should punch up, not kick down

At its best, comedy can bridge, unite and heal, rather than divide, bully and perpetuate the very ills that it is uniquely equipped to help us solve.
Troops of the 9th Canadian Infantry Brigade head to shore in Bernières-sur-Mer, Normandy, France on June 6, 1944. Gilbert Alexander Milne, Department of National Defence/Library and Archives Canada, PA-122765

D-Day: The politics involved in how war should be memorialized and remembered

Remembrance for post-veteran generations involves learning about history, trying to comprehend the what, how and why and its relevance today.
A lawsuit filed on April 12 alleges that Tesla CEO Elon Musk illegally delayed disclosing his stake in Twitter so he could buy more shares at lower prices. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

If Elon Musk succeeds in his Twitter takeover, it would restrict, rather than promote, free speech

Elon Musk’s attempt to take over Twitter uses free speech as the motivation, but research shows that unregulated online spaces result in increased harassment for marginalized users.
Researchers say conspiracy theories around COVID-19 are spreading at an alarming rate across the country — and they warn that misinformation shared online may lead to devastating consequences. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Sowing the seeds of science: How thinking of information like a garden can help us address misinformation

Gardening provides a helpful metaphor to help us understand how individual and platform approaches to misinformation need to be accompanied by policy and cultural reforms.
What hapens when someone outside of the university community co-ordinates a mass email campaign demanding the firing of a faculty member? University policies need to cover this. (Shutterstock)

Post-secondary workplace harassment policies need to adapt to digital life

Where policies do address online abuse and harassment, they’re largely ineffective in a world where academics engage with people in a variety of public platforms and through social media.
One of the most common reactions during a crisis is the urge to help others. Here a health-care worker watches as the first doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine are delivered to a long-term care facility in Montréal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

From the Cold War to COVID-19: The 8 common ways people behave in a crisis

While the world is dealing with the biggest health emergency in more than a century, the way people have reacted to the crisis is familiar and predictable.
In lieu of in-person gatherings, holiday and end-of-year celebrations will be virtual because of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. (Shutterstock)

All Zoomed out? How to deal with Zoom fatigue over the holiday season

The second (and third) wave of the pandemic continues as the end-of-year holiday season approaches. Here are strategies to fight Zoom fatigue while staying virtually close to your loved ones.
Young people don’t pay attention to government communication on COVID-19 because they don’t like being talked at rather than listened to. Alexis Brown/Unsplash

Why young people tune out government COVID-19 messaging

Communicators must listen to the frustrations, fears and concerns of young people about COVID-19. Then they need to speak to them like human beings, rather than talk at them.

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