South African Medical Research Council

The South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC) was established in 1969 with the aim to deliver on a mandate to promote the improvement of the health and the quality of life of the population of our country through research, development and technology transfer.

The scope of the SAMRC’s research includes basic laboratory investigations, clinical research and public health studies. Research at the SAMRC focuses on the ten highest causes of death in South Africa and includes TB, HIV, chronic diseases, alcohol and drug abuse, and women’s health.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 44 articles

People exercising in Ellis Park in Johannesburg, South Africa. Dino Lloyd/Gallo Images via Getty Images

South Africans must be healthier for universal healthcare to succeed

South Africa faces high levels of noncommunicable diseases such as diabetes and hypertension. The NHI is likely to battle to cope with treating large numbers of sick people.
A volunteer receives an injection from a medical worker during the country’s first human clinical trial for a potential vaccine against COVID-19 in Soweto, South Africa. Felix Dlangamandla/Beeld/Gallo Images via Getty Images

COVID-19 vaccine: the challenges of running a trial in the middle of a pandemic

In a pandemic like this one, the priority is to save lives. But without a vaccine, there's a limit in the tools available to save lives.
A couple taking in the view from Table Mountain, Cape Town. Getty Images

We found high UV doses at high-altitude hiking trails in Reunion and Cape Town

Too much ultraviolet radiation is dangerous for human health. Excessive exposure can cause skin ageing and sunburn and can induce melanoma, cataracts, ocular melanoma, and immunodeficiency.
A member of the South African National Defence Force hands out pamphlets informing township residents about COVID-19 in Johannesburg. Kim Ludbrook/EPA-EFE

Can the philosophy of ubuntu help provide a way to face health crises?

Ubuntu provides a language for people to participate in preventive action, even if this involves practices such as lockdowns.
A closer look at men in South Africa reveals a very complicated picture. Shutterstock

Men and HIV: how poverty, violence and inequality play a part

Poverty, traumatic experiences, and gender inequalities, directly increased HIV-risk behaviours such as having unprotected sex and having multiple sexual partners.

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