Menu Close

South African Medical Research Council

The South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC) was established in 1969 with the aim to deliver on a mandate to promote the improvement of the health and the quality of life of the population of our country through research, development and technology transfer.

The scope of the SAMRC’s research includes basic laboratory investigations, clinical research and public health studies. Research at the SAMRC focuses on the ten highest causes of death in South Africa and includes TB, HIV, chronic diseases, alcohol and drug abuse, and women’s health.

Links

Displaying 1 - 20 of 65 articles

Holidaymakers relax on the South Beach during New Year festivities in Durban after the government lifted COVID-19 restrictions. Photo by Rajesh Jantilal/AFP via Getty Images

South Africa has changed tack on tackling COVID: why it makes sense

The South African government has chosen a pragmatic approach that balances the potential direct and detrimental indirect effects of Covid.
Through their vaccination choices, parents are often communicating not just what they think, but also who they are. Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Unpacking parents’ reasons for not vaccinating their children: why it matters

Vaccination uptake is influenced by many factors and carries a variety of meanings – social, political, economic, ideological, moral as well as biological.
Young people living in urban informal settlement are exposed to high levels of violence and poverty. Darren Stewart/Gallo Images via Getty Images

How poverty and violence are linked with anxiety in young South Africans

Young people living in the challenging contexts of urban informal settlements may be more at risk of experiencing generalised anxiety disorder.
Vaccine hesitancy is a growing public health problem. Sharon Seretlo/Gallo Images via Getty Images

South Africa’s immunisation record risks being dented by anti-vaccination views

Vaccine hesitancy has resulted in multiple vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks. Research on vaccine hesitancy in South Africa is limited. But growing evidence suggests that it’s becoming a problem.
People relying on HIV prevention, care and treatment services have become even more vulnerable because of COVID-19. Foto24/Gallo Images/Getty Images

Why it’s important to keep diagnosing and treating HIV during the COVID-19 pandemic

If the world is single-minded and focuses purely on combating one pandemic, forgetting others, the effects of other morbidity and mortality on healthcare systems will be seen for a long time to come.

Authors

More Authors