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Texas A&M University

Texas A&M is the state’s oldest public university and largest university, and one of the largest in the nation: a research-intensive, land-grant institution with more than 69,300 students, including nearly 15,000 in graduate or professional school. Students choose from more than 130 undergraduate and 272 graduate degree programs in 16 colleges and schools, and participate in more than 1,100 student-run organizations and activities (including the Big Event, the largest one-day, student-run service project in the United States).

Texas A&M ranks in the top 20 nationally in research expenditures, with more than $922 million in FY2018 (National Science Foundation), and is a member of the Association of American Universities. Texas A&M ranks at or near the top among universities nationally in the areas of academic excellence, value, and affordability; on-time student graduation rates (both overall and for minorities); student engagement and happiness; and students who graduate with less college-related debt and become the nation’s highest-earning graduates. Texas A&M also has more graduates serving as CEOs of Fortune 500 companies than any other university.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 257 articles

Opinion journalism can rile people up – or it can bring them together. momentimages/Getty Images

Local newspapers can help reduce polarization with opinion pages that focus on local issues

The best op-ed pages operate like a town square, allowing readers to discuss and debate issues important to their communities and beyond. But many now focus on divisive national political issues.
Just feeling that there’s someone out there she can count on can help a mom-to-be. d3sign/Moment via Getty Images

Pregnant women’s brains show troubling signs of stress – but feeling strong social support can break those patterns

Fetal brains are changing rapidly over the course of pregnancy, but so are the brains of mothers-to-be. Neuroscience research shows one way worry can start taking hold – and a simple way to help.
MRNA is an important messenger, carrying the instructions for life from DNA to the rest of the cell. ktsimage/iStock via Getty Images Plus

What is mRNA? The messenger molecule that’s been in every living cell for billions of years is the key ingredient in some COVID-19 vaccines

Recently in the spotlight for its role in the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines, mRNA is not a new invention. It's a crucial messenger molecule at work every day in every cell in your body.
Stacked disasters – like a winter storm that damages a water system during a pandemic – can provide lessons for the next time around. AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis

5 strategies to prepare now for the next pandemic

Shoring up surveillance and response systems and learning lessons from how the COVID-19 pandemic unfolded will help the world be ready the next time around.
Texas’ announced it is ending its COVID-19 restrictions. Its vaccination rate is among the lowest in the U.S., and its case numbers are still high. Montinique Monroe/Getty Images

States drop COVID-19 mask mandates but still expect people to mask up – will they?

The COVID-19 case spike in the summer of 2020 and earlier attempts to rely on personal responsibility, like wearing seat belts, showed that mandates make a difference.
Prison inmates hold a meeting on addiction in May 2016 at the York Community Reintegration Center in Niantic, Connecticut. John Moore/Getty Images

How the Affordable Care Act can keep people out of prison

Many people who are incarcerated have problems with substance abuse, which often may have led to their incarceration. A lack of health insurance often impedes their ability to get treatment.
Pro-Trump rioters trying to enter Capitol building. A recent poll showed that up to one-fifth of Americans supported the assault on the Capitol. Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

Strong political institutions can uphold democracy, even if people can’t agree on politics

To repair the public's dwindling trust in the federal government, politicians must recommit to the impartial cooperation that bolsters political institutions.
Maria Saravia, a worker at the University of Southern California’s Keck Hospital, adjusts her mother’s mask before her COVID-19 vaccination. Genaro Molina/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Why the next major hurdle to ending the pandemic will be about persuading people to get vaccinated

Getting a vaccine is proving difficult for many older people now, but the mad rush for the vaccine won't last long. Many people don't want to get one at all, and that will impede herd immunity.

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