Texas A&M University

Opened in 1876 as Texas’ first public institution of higher learning, Texas A&M University is a research-intensive flagship university with more than 50,000 students — including 10,000 graduate students — studying in more than 120 undergraduate and 240 graduate degree programs in 16 colleges and schools. Students can join any of 800 student organizations and countless activities ranging from athletics and recreation to professional and community service events.

But there’s more than just numbers that make up the Aggie experience. There’s access to world-class research programs and award-winning faculty. There are opportunities to learn in and out of the classroom whether through technology or through one of our branch campuses or international study centers.

Texas A&M is “developing leaders of character dedicated to serving the greater good.”

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Pres. Trump shows off an executive order he signed Oct. 12, 2017 to undo parts of the Affordable Care Act. AP Photo/Evan Vucci

Will Obamacare marketplaces suffer as open enrollment begins?

Frustrated with Congress for its failure to replace Obamacare, President Trump took matters into his own hands and issued an executive order to nix parts of it. How his order will play out is unknown.
Crews clean up debris in a neighborhood flooded by Hurricane Harvey in Beaumont, Texas, Sept. 26, 2017. AP Photo/David Goldman

Scientist at work: Measuring public health impacts after disasters

Epidemiologists study disease outbreaks in populations to determine who gets sick and why. In the wake of this year's hurricanes, they are assessing impacts from mold, toxic leaks and other threats.
Workers clear debris on Sept. 25, 2017 from the top of a building that collapsed in Mexico City after the Sept. 19 earthquake. AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell

Mexico’s road to recovery after quakes is far longer than it looks

Natural disasters are not only bad in the short term. Many families will see their health, well-being and ability to escape poverty affected for decades, and some will be affected for life.
Aedes Aegypti mosquitoes viewed through a microscope in Broward County, Florida, in June 2016. AP Photo/Lynne Sladky

Harvey and Irma present nearly perfect conditions for Zika-spreading mosquitoes

Vast amounts of standing water in Houston and other hurricane-flooded areas are dangerous not only because of toxins. The water is a dangerous breeding ground for mosquitoes that transmit Zika.
Cars leaving Beaumont, Texas during a mandatory evacuation before the arrival of Hurricane Gustav, August 30, 2008. Patsy Lynch/FEMA

Why Texans heard conflicting messages about evacuating ahead of Hurricane Harvey

Why did some Texas coastal cities order mandatory evacuations ahead of Hurricane Harvey while others, including Houston, did not? There is no formula for these decisions; either choice can backfire.
How will we react when cars start driving themselves? Patramansky Oleg/Shutterstock.com

Self-driving cars are coming – but are we ready?

How might we, and our nation's roads and highways, need to change as autonomous vehicles become more ubiquitous? We know a lot of the answers, but not all of them.
When a man was diagnosed with Ebola in Dallas in 2014, workers cleared out the apartment unit where he had been staying. Reuters/Jim Young

How Trump’s global health budget endangers Americans

President Trump wants to slash global health funding at a time when more investment is needed, not less. This spending can protect Americans – as well as foreigners – from deadly diseases.
Mack Beggs, a 17-year-old transgender boy, made national headlines when he won the Texas state wrestling title in the girls’ division. AP Photo

Better locker rooms: It’s not just a transgender thing

While various legal battles continue over the rights of transgender athletes, one thing is clear: Inclusive, privacy-centric locker rooms are a solution that benefits everyone.
Cancer cells, in red, cannibalize a type of stem cell, shown in green. The red cells with small specks of green are breast cancer cells that have “eaten” the stem cell. Author provided.

How ‘cannibalism’ by breast cancer cells promotes dormancy: A possible clue into cancer recurrence

After treatment for breast cancer, many women receive the news that they are cancer-free. In many cases, the disease will come back. How and why does that happen? New findings offer an explanation.

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