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Texas A&M University

Texas A&M is the state’s oldest public university and largest university, and one of the largest in the nation: a research-intensive, land-grant institution with more than 69,300 students, including nearly 15,000 in graduate or professional school. Students choose from more than 130 undergraduate and 272 graduate degree programs in 16 colleges and schools, and participate in more than 1,100 student-run organizations and activities (including the Big Event, the largest one-day, student-run service project in the United States).

Texas A&M ranks in the top 20 nationally in research expenditures, with more than $922 million in FY2018 (National Science Foundation), and is a member of the Association of American Universities. Texas A&M ranks at or near the top among universities nationally in the areas of academic excellence, value, and affordability; on-time student graduation rates (both overall and for minorities); student engagement and happiness; and students who graduate with less college-related debt and become the nation’s highest-earning graduates. Texas A&M also has more graduates serving as CEOs of Fortune 500 companies than any other university.

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Twitter will soon be without the benefits – and problems – of a public board of directors. A-Digit/DigitalVision Vectors via Getty Images

Elon Musk won’t have a board to watch him when he takes Twitter private – does that matter?

Musk’s tweets badgering Twitter’s board raised important corporate governance questions about a board’s purpose and whether its members should own shares in the company they oversee.
While the vast majority of primary care providers have higher confidence in vaccines than the general public, some do not. Evgeniy Shkolenko/iStock via Getty Images Plus

The 1 in 10 U.S. doctors with reservations about vaccines could be undermining the fight against COVID-19

Many COVID-19 vaccination campaigns encourage doctors to serve as a trusted source of vaccine information. But certain vaccine-hesitant providers may stymie these efforts.
Smith & Wesson handguns on display at the Shooting, Hunting and Outdoor Trade Show in Las Vegas, Jan. 19, 2016. AP Photo/John Locher

Fewer Americans are hunting, and that raises hard questions about funding conservation through gun sales

Every gun and bullet sold in the U.S. generates excise taxes to support conservation. But Americans are buying guns now for different reasons than in the past – and increasingly, not for hunting.
A new brain-imaging study finds that participants who had even mild COVID-19 showed an average reduction in whole brain sizes. Kirstypargeter/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Even mild cases of COVID-19 can leave a mark on the brain, such as reductions in gray matter – a neuroscientist explains emerging research

New research offers insights into the brain after COVID-19 that may have implications for our understanding of long COVID-19 and how the disease affects our senses of taste and smell.
Some resorts have launched diversity efforts to try to appeal to a wider community. Johannes Kroemer via Getty Images

Rising costs of climate change threaten to make skiing a less diverse, even more exclusive sport

As temperatures warm, ski and snowboard resorts are investing more in snowmaking and seeing their seasons shrink. Those costs roll down to customers in an already expensive sport.
When persuasion stops and violence begins, that’s the line between ‘legitimate political discourse’ and something very different, scholars explain. AP Photo/John Minchillo

What is ‘legitimate political discourse,’ and does it include the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol?

Legitimate political discourse is based on persuasion, not coercion or violence. Two scholars of communication and democracy explain the difference.
Brian Flores was one of a few nonwhite head coaches until he was fired after the 2022 season. Photo by Wesley Hitt/Getty Images

Almost all NFL coaches are white – lawsuit focuses on league’s abysmal record hiring diverse coaches

Despite efforts to diversify its prominent coaching ranks, the NFL has an abysmal record of hiring people of color. A recently fired Black coach’s suit alleging discrimination may hold the NFL accountable.
Why did she do all the work while Santa got all the glory? What would happen if she delivered the toys? Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

How Mrs. Claus embodied 19th-century debates about women’s rights

Many early stories praise her work ethic and devotion. But with Mrs. Claus usually hitting the North Pole’s glass ceiling, some writers started to push back.
Chances are some of your data has already been stolen, but that doesn’t mean you should shrug data breaches off. WhataWin/iStock via Getty Images

How vulnerable is your personal information? 4 essential reads

Data breaches have become a fact of life. Here are articles from The Conversation that detail the threat, why it happens and what you can do to protect yourself.
Video games are part of a multibillion-dollar industry in which lucrative employment opportunities abound. SDI Productions via Getty Images

5 ways to break into the video game industry

A former video game executive offers advice on how to land a job in the industry.
Aerial view of the 6-megawatt Stanton Solar Farm near Orlando, Fla. Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Who pays and who benefits from a massive expansion of solar power?

President Biden’s proposed solar power expansion would cost $350 billion in federal support over the coming decade. An energy expert explains where that money would come from and who it would help.

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