Texas A&M University

Texas A&M is the state’s oldest public university and largest university, and one of the largest in the nation: a research-intensive, land-grant institution with 68,400 students, including 14,900 in graduate or professional school. Students choose from more than 130 undergraduate and 240 graduate degree programs in 16 colleges and schools, and participate in more than 1,100 student-run organizations and activities (including the Big Event, the largest one-day, student-run service project in the United States).

Texas A&M ranks sixteenth nationally in research expenditures, with more than $892 in FY2016 (National Science Foundation), and is a member of the Association of American Universities. Texas A&M ranks at or near the top among universities nationally in the areas of academic excellence, value, and affordability; on-time student graduation rates (both overall and for minorities); student engagement and happiness; and students who graduate with less college-related debt and become the nation’s highest-earning graduates. Texas A&M also is tied for having the most graduates serving as CEOs of Fortune 500 companies.

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Cancer care for adults could be improved if caregivers provided the empathy they provide to children, the authors suggest. ESB Professional/Shutterstock.com

How lessons from childhood cancer care could improve adult cancer care

Pediatric cancer is one of the cruelest of diseases, and caregivers develop special skills to help their patients. Research shows that caregivers for adults could learn some things from them.
Radical policy shifts are a hallmark of the Trump administration. On May 8, the president announced that the U.S. would withdraw from the international Iran nuclear deal. Reuters/Jonathan Ernst

Presidents often reverse US foreign policy — how Trump handles setbacks is what matters most now

Many presidents have radically changed US foreign policy. Truman created his own doctrine. Carter gave up the Panama Canal. But a presidential historian sees danger in Trump's decision-making style.
What will it take to finish polio off in the last three countries where it persists? AP Photo/B.K. Bangash

Inching closer to a world without polio

Pakistan had only eight new diagnoses of polio in 2017. The virus' days look numbered – but health workers have their work cut out for them to eradicate the devastating disease once and for all.
Could the solution to a nuclear North Korea lie in arbitration? Reuters/Damir Sagolj

Arbitration as a way out of the North Korean crisis

Trump and Kim are due to meet this spring. But if these talks fail could international arbitration provide - as it has in the past - an alternative way out of the North Korean crisis?
In this March 18, 2011 photo, Cassidy Hempel waved at hospital staff as she was being treated for a rare disorder. Her mother Chris, left, fought to gain permission for an experimental drug. AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez

Giving patients the ‘right to try’ experimental drugs is a political maneuver, not a lifesaver

Congress has sent a bill to the White House. It gives terminally-ill patients more false hope than chances for a cure.
In this Dec. 3, 2014 photo, liver cancer patient Crispin Lopez Serrano talks to an oncology nurse at a hospital in Clackamas, Ore. AP Photo/Gosia Wozniacka

How kindness can make a difference in cancer care

Great strides have been made in cancer care over the past decades. As World Cancer Day on Feb. 4 approaches, it's important to note the growing role that kindness and empathy play in good care.
‘I don’t care what they say about me,’ P.T. Barnum once said, ‘as long as they spell my name correctly.’ Everett Historical/Shutterstock.com

How the ‘Greatest Showman’ paved the way for Donald Trump

The new movie about P.T. Barnum couldn’t come at a better time: It's impossible not to see his ghost in our culture, in our advertisements and in our president.

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