Menu Close

University at Buffalo

The University at Buffalo is a premier research-intensive public university, the largest and most comprehensive campus in the State University of New York. UB’s nearly 30,000 students pursue their academic interests through more than 300 undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs. Founded in 1846, the University at Buffalo is a member of the Association of American Universities.

Links

Displaying 1 - 20 of 101 articles

Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, hugging another guest, along with Kellyanne Conway (left) and Notre Dame University President Rev. John Jenkins (right) tested positive for COVID-19. The Washington Post via Getty Images

Being outdoors doesn’t mean you’re safe from COVID-19 – a White House event showed what not to do

The outdoors is less risky than an enclosed room, but it isn't a COVID-19-free zone. Here's what you need to know.
White House physician Sean Conley gives an update on the patient-in-chief on Oct. 3. Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

VIP patients can be a headache for their doctors

When a celebrity, politician or other influential person checks in, a health care team can feel pressured to give in to a VIP's wishes.
Something about our current moment seems to have put a particular strain on our personal relationships. Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

Why friendships are falling apart over politics

A recent Pew survey showed just how deep the divide has become, with about 40% of registered voters saying that they didn't have a single close friend supporting a different presidential candidate.
Un paper de alto perfil sobre los riesgos del medicamento antimalárico hidroxicloriquina fue retirado en junio. AP Photo/John Locher,

Controversias en la investigación del coronavirus muestran que la ciencia está funcionando como debería

La urgencia de encontrar soluciones a la pandemia de COVID-19 aumenta la posibilidad de investigación descuidada. Pero el escrutinio y la posterior corrección muestran que la ciencia está funcionando.
Fitness information from wearable devices can reveal when the body is fighting an infection. Nico De Pasquale Photography/Stone via Getty Images

Wearable fitness devices deliver early warning of possible COVID-19 infection

Fitness information like resting heart rate collected by wearable devices can't diagnose diseases, but it can signal when something is wrong. That can be enough to prompt a COVID-19 test.
A 1974 photograph of Buffalo’s Shoreline Apartments. George Burns/National Arcvhives at College Park

Should architecturally significant low-income housing be preserved?

Mismanaged and in disrepair, many low-income housing complexes are nonetheless seen as important avatars of modern architecture. But are calls for their preservation forgetting those who matter most?
The death of George Floyd when a police officer kneeled on his neck sparked days of protests in cities across the U.S. Lauren A. Little/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty

How to protest during a pandemic and still keep everyone safe from coronavirus

It's nearly impossible to avoid close contact when protesting, and easy to forget the risks. An infectious disease expert answers key questions about how to avoid spreading the coronavirus to family.
U.S. Customs officers stand beside a sign at the US/Canada border in Lansdowne, Ontario, on March 22, 2020. Lars Hagberg / AFP via Getty Images

Shuttered Canada-US border highlights different approaches to the pandemic – and differences between the 2 countries

The US and Canada have had a long, supportive relationship. But the recent closure of the US-Canada border because of the coronavirus underscores a growing divide between the two countries.
A restaurant in Bangkok created plastic partitions and moved its tables farther apart to separate guests in a normally tight space. Lillian Suwanrumpha/AFP/Getty Images

How to lower your coronavirus risk while eating out: Restaurant advice from an infectious disease expert

It's hard to eat while wearing a face mask, and social distancing isn't easy in restaurants' normally tight quarters. An infectious disease expert offers some tips on what to look for to stay safe.
It would be fun to be able to shrink people and objects, but it’s something we can only imagine. Jasmin Merdan/Moment via Getty Images

Will we ever be able to shrink and grow stuff?

The movies make it seem like someday we'll be able to make people and objects grow really big or shrink really small. Whether this will be possible comes down to the smallest of things.
Air conditioning cools city residents during heat waves, but also strains the power grid and fuels climate change. Joanna Poe/Flickr

To protect people in the Great Lakes region from climate extremes, weatherize their homes

Climate change is making extreme weather events, both hot and cold, more frequent across the Great Lakes region. Weatherizing low-income residents' homes is an important way to prepare.
Air raid wardens in Washington, D.C., conduct a practice air raid. Office for Emergency Management, Office of War Information/National Archives

Cold War-style preparedness could help fight future pandemics

Since the Cold War, Americans have shifted from engaging in active self-rescue to passively waiting for help from a centralized, bureaucratic federal emergency response.
Too much caffeine interferes with sleep. Luis Molinero/Shutterstock.com

Is it OK for teens to drink coffee?

Since caffeine is in so many different foods and drinks, it's easy for kids – or grownups – to get more than they should without realizing it.
Pope Francis recently removed a secrecy rule to increase transparency for sexual abuse cases. AP Photo/Andrew Medichini

Pope ends a secrecy rule for Catholic sexual abuse cases, but for victims many barriers to justice remain

Pope Francis recently removed a rule known as Pontifical Secrecy, which allowed clergy and church officials to withhold information regarding sexual abuse. Will it make the church truly transparent?

Authors

More Authors