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University of Alberta

The University of Alberta in Edmonton is one of Canada’s top teaching and research universities, with an international reputation for excellence across the humanities, sciences, creative arts, business, engineering, and health sciences. Home to 39,000 students and 15,000 faculty and staff, the university has an annual budget of $1.84 billion and attracts nearly $450 million in sponsored research revenue. The U of A offers close to 400 rigorous undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs in 18 faculties on five campuses—including one rural and one francophone campus. The university has more than 275,000 alumni worldwide. The university and its people remain dedicated to the promise made in 1908 by founding president Henry Marshall Tory that knowledge shall be used for “uplifting the whole people.”

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 141 articles

People getting vaccinated may still have questions about COVID-19 vaccines, like why it takes two doses — and then two weeks — to take full effect. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

I work at a COVID-19 vaccine clinic. Here’s what people ask me when they’re getting their shot — and what I tell them

A medical student answers questions he gets asked at a COVID-19 vaccine clinic: Efficacy versus real-world effectiveness, immune response and how the mRNA vaccines compare to vaccines already in wide use.
Some programs or activities may inadvertently help curb greenhouse gas emissions or help communities adapt. Countries must take stock of these if we are to fully understand how close we are to meeting the goals of the Paris Agreement. (Shutterstock)

COP26: How the world will measure progress on the Paris climate agreement and keep countries accountable

Every five years nations must evaluate their progress towards the goals of the Paris Agreement. But this “stocktake” lacks detail making it difficult to measure progress on climate action.
When the messenger is distrusted, adherence to public health advice fails. Anti-mask protesters hold signs during a demonstration against measures taken by public health authorities to curb the spread of COVID-19 in St. Thomas, Ont., in November 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Geoff Robins

Public health campaigns can be ruined by the personal conduct of politicians

When politicians disregard public health directives, new research shows it causes the public to distrust governments’ handling of crises like the COVID-19 pandemic.
Sprinter Amerika Allyson Felix merayakan bersama putrinya Camryn setelah finis kedua dalam lomba lari 400 meter putri di US Olympic Track and Field Trials pada 20 Juni. AP Photo/Ashley Landis

Olimpiade Tokyo menjadi Olimpiade bersejarah bagi para ibu

Sekarang kehamilan tidak lagi menandai akhir karir seorang atlet, banyak atlet elit tidak hanya kembali ke olahraga, tapi terus memecahkan rekor pribadi dan dunia sebagai ibu baru.
Wildfires not only trigger evacuations, they limit the possible escape routes. (BC Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure, TranBC/flickr)

We can’t predict the next wildfire disaster – but we can plan for it

Efforts to predict wildfire risk and to prioritize mitigation efforts aren’t enough. We must prepare for fire disasters wherever possible and decide what we’ll do when they happen.
American sprinter Allyson Felix celebrates with her daughter Camryn after finishing second in the women’s 400-metre race at the U.S. Olympic Track and Field Trials on June 20. (AP Photo/Ashley Landis)

The Tokyo Olympics will be the Games of all mothers

The Tokyo Games might be the most gender-equal games in history, but many competition barriers still exist for elite athletes who are mothers.
An upside down maple leaf is tucked behind a plaque as people gather on Parliament Hill in Ottawa at a rally to honour the lives lost to residential schools and demand justice for Indigenous peoples, on Canada Day, July 1, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Reconciliation and Residential Schools: Canadians need new stories to face a future better than what we inherited

Considering our relationships to stories about the past and looking at learning as a process of encounter can help Canadians to become better treaty partners.
Instead of returning to the northern research status quo, researchers should make community health and well-being the top priority. Above: Nain, Nunatsiavut. Christina Goldhar

‘Return to normal’ travel and research may bring hazards to northern, Indigenous communities

Summer 2021 is too soon for southern-based researchers and travellers to return to northern, Indigenous communities in the wake of COVID-19, for research fieldwork or leisure.
In February, the Innu Council of Ekuanitshit and the Minganie Regional County Municipality declared the Muteshekau Shipu (Magpie River) a legal person, a move that may provide greater certainty for this majestic river’s future. (Boreal River)

Rights for nature: How granting a river ‘personhood’ could help protect it

A recent declaration of a river as a legal person in Canada recognizes Indigenous laws and governance, and champions people as the guardians of nature.
People with a plan feel more empowered and self-reliant during wildfire disasters. They have better mental and physical health outcomes than those who were less prepared. (Shutterstock)

Prepare for the worst: 10 steps to get ready for wildfire smoke

Wildfire smoke is both inevitable and largely unpredictable. We need to change our activities and behaviours to limit exposure to wildfire smoke and protect health.
Why have Uber drivers been regarded more favourably than taxi drivers? Lexi Anderson/Unsplash

How Uber drivers avoided — and contributed to — the fate of taxi drivers

Taxi drivers and Uber drivers perform the same work, but Uber’s categorization as a tech company has contributed to the historical stigma against taxi drivers.
Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin is taken into custody at the Hennepin County Courthouse in Minneapolis, Minn., after being found guilty of murder in the 2020 death of George Floyd. (Court TV via AP, Pool)

Justice for George Floyd: Derek Chauvin’s guilty verdicts must result in fundamental changes to policing

The trial of Derek Chauvin for the murder of George Floyd reveals a broken system of policing. The guilty verdicts should be a starting point for fundamental and meaningful change.
After George Floyd’s death at the hands of police in Minneapolis, Minn., protestors all over the United States, including in Los Angeles, pictured here on May 30, 2020, demonstrated against police brutality. (Shutterstock)

The United States is at risk of an armed anti-police insurgency

The continued killings of Black people at the hands of the police in the United States has contributed to an environment of continued marginalization and oppression.

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