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University of California, Riverside

The University of California, Riverside is one of 10 universities within the prestigious University of California system, and the only UC located in Inland Southern California. Widely recognized as one of the most ethnically diverse research universities in the nation, UCR’s current enrollment is more than 21,000 students, with a goal of 25,000 students by 2020. The campus is in the midst of a tremendous growth spurt with new and remodeled facilities coming on-line on a regular basis.

UCR is consistently ranked as one of the most ethnically and economically diverse universities in the United States.

The 2014 U.S. News & World Report Best Colleges rankings places UCR 55th among top public universities, 112th nationwide and ranks 16+ graduate school programs including the Graduate School of Education and the Bourns College of Engineering based on peer assessment, student selectivity, financial resources, and other factors. Washington Monthly ranked UCR 5th in the United States in terms of social mobility, research and community service, while U.S. News ranks UCR as the fifth most ethnically diverse and, by the number of undergraduates receiving Pell Grants (42 percent), the 15th most economically diverse student body in the nation.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 41 articles

Building solar panels over water sources is one way to both provide power and reduce evaporation in drought-troubled regions. Robin Raj, Citizen Group & Solar Aquagrid

These energy innovations could transform how we mitigate climate change, and save money in the process – 5 essential reads

From pulling carbon dioxide out of the air to turning water into fuel, innovators are developing new technologies and pairing existing ones to help slow global warming.
A pilot plant near the Salton Sea in California pairs lithium extraction with geothermal energy production. Michael McKibben

How a few geothermal plants could solve America’s lithium supply crunch and boost the EV battery industry

Lithium is essential for batteries that power electric vehicles and store energy from solar and wind farms. A new U.S. source could provide 10 times more lithium than the country uses today.
Facebook’s Oversight Board recently upheld a decision to remove posts using ethnic slurs against Azerbaijanis. Here Azerbaijani troops march during a military parade in Baku in December 2020 in celebration of a peace deal with Armenia. (AP Photo)

Facebook is stepping in where governments won’t on free expression

The decisions made by Facebook through its content moderators and Oversight Board have significant implications for the exercise of worldwide freedom of expression and speech.
At the turn of the 20th century, marriage was assumed to be an exercise in mutual misery. Getty Images

The white supremacist origins of modern marriage advice

Concerned about the state of marriage – and thus the ability of whites to procreate – eugenicists were behind some of the earliest modern marriage manuals.
Farmworkers are essential workers who must decide every morning whether they will leave their home to work the fields to provide for their families and the nation. John Moore/Getty Images News via Getty Images

Rethinking what research means during a global pandemic

In the wake of COVID-19, researchers can become trusted figures of authority who can re-appropriate their networks, skills and knowledge to better the lives of vulnerable populations.
US marines walk through the rebuilt palace of King Nebuchadnezzar, in the ancient town of Babylon, in April 2003. The ruins suffered serious damage when American troops set up a military base amid the ruins during the Iraq War. Reuters/Jerry Lampen

‘World Heritage’ site selection is Eurocentric – and that shapes which historic places get love and money

A scholar analyzed data about UNESCO World Heritage sites to explain why European cultural relics like Notre Dame are so beloved, while splendid monuments elsewhere remain relatively unknown.
Searching for planets around nearby stars is like searching for a needle in a field of haystacks. Trevor Dobson/Flikr

How we found a white dwarf – a stellar corpse – by accident

Science is full of surprises. While searching for planets orbiting nearby stars, researchers stumbled across the remains of a star that once outshone the Sun.
Journalist Jamal Khashoggi at a 2014 press conference in Bahrain. AP/Hasan Jamali

Why Jamal Khashoggi’s murder took place in a consulate

Jamal Khashoggi’s brutal murder happened at a consulate, a space not subject to the laws of the host country, Turkey. That means the alleged murderers did not fear interference by local authorities.
This won’t hurt a bit. Gregory Johnston/shutterstock.com

Does pain expected equal pain felt? Ask a kid

Does your child hate their visits to the pediatrician? Do they psyche themselves into a panic that the shot will hurt? The best strategy to calm an anxious child may be to reframe their expectations.
An artist’s impression of the exoplanet in close orbit to a star. ESA, NASA, G. Tinetti (University College London, UK & ESA) and M. Kornmesser (ESA/Hubble)

We’ve found an exo-planet with an extraordinarily eccentric orbit

A solitary planet in an eccentric orbit around an ancient star may help astronomers understand exactly how such planetary systems are formed.
For veterans going back to school, student life can involve many stresses. US Department of Education

The emotional challenges of student veterans on campus

Since 2009, nearly one million veterans have benefited from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, which helps them pay for tuition and other expenses. A scholar explains how it’s a hard transition.

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