University of California, San Francisco

The leading university exclusively focused on health, UC San Francisco is driven by the idea that when the best research, the best education and the best patient care converge, great breakthroughs are achieved.

A hallmark of its excellence is UCSF’s spirit of collaboration that is carried through its partnerships across the campus and the world in pursuit of its advancing health worldwide™ mission.

Its faculty include five Nobel laureates, who have made seminal contributions to advance the understanding of cancer, neurodegenartive diseases, aging and stem cell research.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 55 articles

SARS-CoV-2 turns on a cellular switch to build the tubes in this photo – called filopodia – that might help viral particles – the little spheres – spread more easily. Dr Elizabeth Fischer, NIAID NIH / Bouhaddou et al. Elsevier 2020

Coronavirus and cancer hijack the same parts in human cells to spread – and our team identified existing cancer drugs that could fight COVID-19

Kinases are cellular control switches. When they malfunction, they can cause cancer. The coronavirus hijacks these kinases to replicate, and cancer drugs that target them could fight COVID-19.
Screening for symptoms can catch some cases of COVID-19, but about people who are infected but not showing any symptoms? AP Photo/John Raoux

Can people spread the coronavirus if they don’t have symptoms? 5 questions answered about asymptomatic COVID-19

There is a lot of confusion and concern around asymptomatic spread of SARS-C0V-2. An infectious disease expert explains how many people are asymptomatic and how they can spread the virus.
Today’s high-stress environment is an opportunity to reset how our brains deal with stressful situations. CasarsaGuru/iStock

Want to stop the COVID-19 stress meltdown? Train your brain

With the county facing a crisis in emotional health, we may need two vaccines: one for COVID-19 and another for toxic stress. Here's a technique for dealing with all that stress.
Il existe 20 000 médicaments approuvés par la FDA. Il en existe peut-être un qui pourrait combattre le COVID-19, mais encore faut-il trouver lequel. Peter Dazeley/The Image Bank via Getty Images

Le médicament contre le Covid-19 est peut-être déjà approuvé et sur le marché… mais il faut trouver lequel !

Parmi les 20 000 médicaments approuvés par la FDA, certains peuvent traiter le Covid-19. Une équipe de l’Université de Californie à San Francisco est en train d’identifier des candidats possibles.
There are 20,000 FDA approved drugs. One of them might fight COVID-19, if we can find it. Peter Dazeley/The Image Bank via Getty Images

COVID-19 treatment might already exist in old drugs – we’re using pieces of the coronavirus itself to find them

Among the more than 20,000 drugs approved by the FDA, there may be some that can treat COVID-19. A team at the University of California, San Francisco, is identifying possible candidates.
Male pileated woodpecker. FotoRequest/Shutterstock.com

How do woodpeckers avoid brain injury?

Pecking holes in a solid wood tree trunk would give you a headache, if not serious brain damage. What special assets allow a woodpecker to do it?
Just a few millimeters across, organoids are clumps of cells that resemble the brain. Madeline Andrews, Arnold Kriegstein's lab, UCSF

Brain organoids help neuroscientists understand brain development, but aren’t perfect matches for real brains

Brain organoids are tiny models that neuroscientists use to learn more about how the brain grows and works. But new research finds important differences between the model and the real thing.
Women report abuse during delivery. Shutterstock

Subtle abuse affects women during childbirth

Research in Ghana, India and Kenya shows that more women experience subtle forms of undignified care than they do physical and verbal abuse during childbirth.
Decoding all the DNA in a patient’s biological sample can reveal whether an infectious microbe is causing the disease. ktsdesign/Shutterstock.com

Rapid DNA analysis helps diagnose mystery diseases

Superfast DNA analysis is now being used to crack medical mysteries when physicians can't figure out whether an infectious microbe is causing the disease.
Recreación de las neuronas comunicándose en el cerebro. Whitehoune / Shutterstock

Así descubrimos qué pasa en las neuronas de las personas con autismo

Una nueva tecnología ha permitido a los neurocientíficos examinar la química de las células cerebrales individuales. El hallazgo revela cómo los genes se regulan de manera diferente en las células cerebrales de las personas con autismo en comparación con las personas neurotípicas.

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