Menu Close

University of California, San Francisco

The leading university exclusively focused on health, UC San Francisco is driven by the idea that when the best research, the best education and the best patient care converge, great breakthroughs are achieved.

A hallmark of its excellence is UCSF’s spirit of collaboration that is carried through its partnerships across the campus and the world in pursuit of its advancing health worldwide™ mission.

Its faculty include five Nobel laureates, who have made seminal contributions to advance the understanding of cancer, neurodegenartive diseases, aging and stem cell research.

Links

Displaying 1 - 20 of 70 articles

Most U.S. pandemic policies are not helping those most vulnerable to dying from both COVID-19 and pandemic-driven unemployment, including Blacks, the less educated and the poor. AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar

Forget the debate over public health versus jobs – the same people suffer the most either way

Most pandemic policies have benefited those already best off in US society and ignored people for whom neither mass shutdowns nor reopening offer relief.
Gene-based vaccines had never been approved for humans before the coronavirus pandemic. Juan Gaertner/Science Photo Library via Getty Images

3 medical innovations fueled by COVID-19 that will outlast the pandemic

The coronavirus pandemic has driven a lot of scientific progress in the past year. But just as some of the social changes are likely here to stay, so are some medical innovations.
Seventy-four percent of shows and films with an abortion plot line centered on an impregnated white character, including ‘Little Fires Everywhere.’ Hulu

In 2020, TV and film still couldn’t get abortion right

Hollywood continues to dramatically exaggerate the medical risks associated with abortion while downplaying barriers to access.
The discovery of effective drugs and experience treating COVID-19 gives patients a much better chance at recovery today than early on in the pandemic. AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, pool

Death rates have fallen by 18% for hospitalized COVID–19 patients as treatments improve

Death rates for hospitalized COVID-19 patients fell from 25.6% in March to 7.6% in August, according to a new study on three hospitals in New York. A study in the UK found similar results.
Lorsqu’ils sont infectés, les gens qui portent des masques sont plus susceptibles d'avoir des symptômes plus légers. Wenmei Zhou/Vecteurs de vision numérique via Wenmei Zhou / Digital Vision Vectors via Getty Images

Masques et protection : inhaler moins de coronavirus signifie tomber moins gravement malade

Dans les lieux où le port du masque est respecté, les formes sévères de Covid-19 semblent moins fréquentes. Les masques protégeraient donc non seulement les autres, mais aussi leurs porteurs.
When people wear masks, they can still get infected, but they’re more likely to have milder symptoms. Wenmei Zhou/Digital Vision Vectors via Getty Images

Cloth masks do protect the wearer – breathing in less coronavirus means you get less sick

In places where everyone wears a mask, cases of COVID-19 seem to be less severe. Evidence from labs and outbreaks suggests that masks protect not only others, but the person wearing the mask, too.
SARS-CoV-2 turns on a cellular switch to build the tubes in this photo – called filopodia – that might help viral particles – the little spheres – spread more easily. Dr Elizabeth Fischer, NIAID NIH / Bouhaddou et al. Elsevier 2020

Coronavirus and cancer hijack the same parts in human cells to spread – and our team identified existing cancer drugs that could fight COVID-19

Kinases are cellular control switches. When they malfunction, they can cause cancer. The coronavirus hijacks these kinases to replicate, and cancer drugs that target them could fight COVID-19.
Screening for symptoms can catch some cases of COVID-19, but about people who are infected but not showing any symptoms? AP Photo/John Raoux

Can people spread the coronavirus if they don’t have symptoms? 5 questions answered about asymptomatic COVID-19

There is a lot of confusion and concern around asymptomatic spread of SARS-C0V-2. An infectious disease expert explains how many people are asymptomatic and how they can spread the virus.
Today’s high-stress environment is an opportunity to reset how our brains deal with stressful situations. CasarsaGuru/iStock

Want to stop the COVID-19 stress meltdown? Train your brain

With the county facing a crisis in emotional health, we may need two vaccines: one for COVID-19 and another for toxic stress. Here's a technique for dealing with all that stress.

Authors

More Authors