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University of Connecticut

The University of Connecticut is a national leader among public research universities, where more than 30,000 students are enrolled in over 100 undergraduate majors and 86 graduate fields of study, are situated in prime locations between New York and Boston. In recent years, the University has been busy racking up high-profile nods from organizations like U.S. News & World Report for the quality of its education and initiatives. The rise of the University over the last two decades has been astounding, as UConn achieves new heights of academic success – doubling research grants, attracting top students, and offering programs that continue to grow in prestige. Next Generation Connecticut, an unprecedented investment by the State of Connecticut, demonstrates UConn’s commitment to comprehensive research and education and ensures that we attract internationally renowned faculty and the world’s brightest students. With annual research expenditures in excess of $200 million, collaborative research is carried out within the departments of our 14 schools and colleges and at our more than 100 research centers and institutes. As a vibrant, progressive leader, UConn fosters a diverse and dynamic culture that meets the challenges of a changing global society.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 199 articles

Rioters are tear-gassed as they storm the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

American support for conspiracy theories and armed rebellion isn’t new – we just didn’t believe it before the Capitol insurrection

Almost eight years before the Jan. 6, 2021 Capitol attack, nearly one-third of Americans surveyed – and 44% of Republicans – said armed rebellion might soon be necessary in the US to protect liberties.
If you aren’t a fan of holiday shopping, you aren’t alone. Dave Einsel/Getty Images

What’s the point of holiday gifts?

Gift-giving might seem needlessly cumbersome and stressful. But the costs and benefits of the custom aren’t what they seem.
The legacy of the Sandy Hook shootings in 2012 continues to reverberate nine years later, including in how conspiracy theories have changed since the tragedy. Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AFP via Getty Images

How conspiracy theories in the US became more personal, more cruel and more mainstream after the Sandy Hook shootings

The Sandy Hook school shooting continues to reverberate in the US nine years later, marking a new age of misinformation.
A 32-year-old forest on former pastureland in northeastern Costa Rica. Robin Chazdon

Tropical forests can recover surprisingly quickly on deforested lands – and letting them regrow naturally is an effective and low-cost way to slow climate change

As governments and corporations pledge to help the planet by planting trillions of trees, a new study spotlights an effective, low-cost alternative: letting tropical forests regrow naturally.
There are dozens of options for children’s drinks in most supermarkets. Choosing the healthy options is difficult. ferrantraite/E+ via Getty Images

Companies are pushing sweetened drinks to children through advertising and misleading labels – and families are buying

A new study looked at advertising and purchase data for children’s drinks and suggests that ads and pricing strategies contribute to sweetened children’s drink purchases.
A young woman fetching water. Climate change literacy rates in Nigeria range from 71% in Kwara to 5% in Kano. Shutterstock

Africa’s first continent-wide survey of climate change literacy finds education is key

Education, historical trends in precipitation, and perceived drought experiences predict increased climate change literacy, but rates are lower for women, those in rural areas, and low-income groups.
Ancient military innovations – like the bit and bridle that enabled mounted horseback riding – changed the course of history. Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin/British Museum via WikimediaCommons

The horse bit and bridle kicked off ancient empires – a new giant dataset tracks the societal factors that drove military technology

Did ancient technological advancements drive social innovation, or vice versa? Studying cause and effect in the ancient world may seem like a fool’s errand, but researchers built a database to do just that.
Creativity has many academic, professional and personal benefits. Stephen Simpson/Stone Collection via Getty Images

How to nurture creativity in your kids

Art classes and STEM toys are nice, but there are simple and free ways parents can encourage their child’s creativity – or keep it from getting squashed.
While ivermectin was originally used to treat river blindness, it has also been repurposed to treat other human parasitic infections. ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP via Getty Images

Ivermectin is a Nobel Prize-winning wonder drug – but not for COVID-19

Ivermectin has been a lifesaving drug for people with parasitic infections like river blindness and strongyloidiasis. But taking it for COVID-19 may result in the opposite effect.
Schools in predominantly Black communities receive less funding, even though Black homeowners pay higher tax rates. Carl Iwasaki/Getty Images

How reparations can be paid through school finance reform

A school finance expert and an education law scholar make the case for why reparations should be paid to African Americans by changing the way schools are funded.
School districts are using federal COVID-19 relief funds to hire more mental health professionals. mmpile/E+ Collection via Getty Images

Students are returning to school with anxiety, grief and gaps in social skills – will there be enough school mental health resources?

A shortage of school psychologists will pose serious problems as children return to school with higher levels of stress and anxiety, two experts on student mental health say.
Though drug recalls are relatively uncommon in the U.S., reduced inspections increase the likelihood of manufacturing errors that slip through the cracks. AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool

The FDA’s weak drug manufacturing oversight is a potentially deadly problem

COVID-19 has exacerbated a backlog of domestic and foreign drug manufacturing inspections that the FDA is still too short-staffed to adequately deal with.

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