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University of Connecticut

The University of Connecticut is a national leader among public research universities, where more than 30,000 students are enrolled in over 100 undergraduate majors and 86 graduate fields of study, are situated in prime locations between New York and Boston. In recent years, the University has been busy racking up high-profile nods from organizations like U.S. News & World Report for the quality of its education and initiatives. The rise of the University over the last two decades has been astounding, as UConn achieves new heights of academic success – doubling research grants, attracting top students, and offering programs that continue to grow in prestige. Next Generation Connecticut, an unprecedented investment by the State of Connecticut, demonstrates UConn’s commitment to comprehensive research and education and ensures that we attract internationally renowned faculty and the world’s brightest students. With annual research expenditures in excess of $200 million, collaborative research is carried out within the departments of our 14 schools and colleges and at our more than 100 research centers and institutes. As a vibrant, progressive leader, UConn fosters a diverse and dynamic culture that meets the challenges of a changing global society.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 180 articles

Do the benefits of approving a drug before confirming it works outweigh the potential costs? monkeybusinessimages/iStock via Getty Images Plus

The FDA’s big gamble on the new Alzheimer’s drug

The FDA approved Alzheimer's disease drug aducanumab despite minimal evidence of its efficacy. Whether this decision ultimately hurts or helps patients depends on data researchers don't yet have.
Prominently placing fresh produce can encourage healthier choices. Brianna Soukup/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Giving food pantry clients choices – and gently nudging them toward nutritious foods – can lead to healthier diets

Behavioral economics, long employed in grocery stores to guide customers to certain products, could be employed by food banks and pantries to encourage healthier choices.
A community drive-thru distribution centre in Vallejo, California in June 2020. John G. Mabanglo/EPA

Why so many Americans are struggling to feed themselves

This is a transcript of episode 16 of The Conversation Weekly podcast The racial hunger gap in American cities and what do about it. In this episode, we look at some of the reasons behind racial disparities…
Exterior of the Pfizer World headquarters building. Pfizer produced the first COVID-19 vaccine to gain emergency use authorization. Sam Aronov/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

Why is the FDA funded in part by the companies it regulates?

The FDA receives almost half its funding from companies it regulates, such as drug and medical device makers. Is this something you should be concerned about?
Franklin Delano Roosevelt, standing at center and facing left just above the eagle, takes the presidential oath of office for the third time in 1941. FDR Presidential Library and Museum via Flickr

Has any US president ever served more than eight years?

Only one president has done so – Franklin Delano Roosevelt – but others considered it, and even tried.
A demonstration outside the Hennepin County Government Center in Minneapolis on March 29, 2021, the day Derek Chauvin’s trial began on charges he murdered George Floyd. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Derek Chauvin trial: 3 questions America needs to ask about seeking racial justice in a court of law

There's a divergence in how a trial is conducted, what rules govern it – and the larger issue of racial justice. That divergence affects the legitimacy of any verdict.
A COVID-19 patient in an ICU unit in a hospital in Capetown, South Africa, in December 2020. A variant emerged in South Africa that has since spread to other parts of the world. Other new variants could emerge elsewhere. Rodger Bosch/AFP via Getty Images

How worried should you be about coronavirus variants? A virologist explains his concerns

As the US vaccinates millions more people each day, the novel coronavirus works to survive. It does this by mutating. So far, several variants are worrisome. A virologist explains what they are.
How can more scientists learn to communicate like Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases? Anna Moneymaker / POOL / AFP via Getty Images

Scientists need to become better communicators, but it’s hard to measure whether training works

#Scicomm is a hashtag, and there are many programs that claim to teach scientists how to be better communicators. But it's hard to show exactly what they're accomplishing.

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