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University of Georgia

The University of Georgia (commonly referred to as UGA or simply Georgia) is an American land-grant university and sea grant research university with its primary campus located on a 759-acre (3.07 km2) campus in Athens, Georgia, US. It is the flagship university of the state of Georgia. The university is ranked 20th overall among all public national universities in the current 2014 U.S. News & World Report rankings and consistently ranks within the top 200 universities worldwide across numerous publications. UGA is classified as a ‘Research University/Very High Activity’, according to the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. The University of Georgia is a part of the University System of Georgia and is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

Founded in 1785 as the United States’s first state-chartered university, it is the oldest and largest of Georgia’s institutions of higher learning and along with the College of William and Mary and the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill claims the title of the oldest public university in the United States. The university’s historic North Campus is on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places as a designated historic district.

The university offers over 140 degree programs in a wide array of disciplines. Consisting of thirteen libraries spread across multiple campuses, UGA Libraries contains a total of 4.7 million volumes and one of nation’s largest map collections. The University of Georgia is one of 126 member institutions that comprise the Association of Research Libraries.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 44 articles

Gender gaps in achievement for AP math exams may lead to fewer women in STEM careers. Mint Images/Getty Images

Girls still fall behind boys in top scores for AP math exams

A scholar warns that women will continue to be underrepresented in STEM careers unless educators focus on helping girls do better in advanced math courses in high school.
Juniper trees, common in Arizona’s Prescott National Forest, have been dying with the drought. Benjamin Roe/USDA Forest Service via AP

Trees are dying of thirst in the Western drought – here’s what’s going on inside their veins

Without enough water, trees can develop embolisms, similar to blockages in human blood vessels, and they’re more likely to die from drought or fires.
The ruins of the Temple of Victory in Himera, which was constructed to commemorate the first battle in 480 B.C. Katherine Reinberger

Teeth of fallen soldiers hold evidence that foreigners fought alongside ancient Greeks, challenging millennia of military history

Are the descriptions of war passed down by ancient historians accurate? A site in Sicily provided a rare chance to fact-check stories told about two battles from more than 2,400 years ago.
School lunch is a lot less fun during a pandemic. Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

How school lunch could improve when classrooms are full again

Students are spreading out when they eat and using more single-serve packaging. Future changes to school meals could be less visible.
Divers excavate a shallow water submerged Mesolithic midden off the island of Hjarnø, Denmark. J. Benjamin.

Ancient undersea middens offer clues about life before rising seas engulfed the coast. Now we have a better way to study them

Undersea shell middens contain important clues about the past - what people ate, who they were interacting with and how the climate was changing. Now we have a better way to detect and excavate them.
Jeffrey Shima

Under the moonlight: a little light and shade helps larval fish to grow at night

Young fish need to find food to grow, but avoid being eaten themselves. That dance for survival is linked to moonlight, which has implications for fisheries management everywhere.
White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows speaks to reporters about President Trump’s positive coronavirus test outside the White House on Oct. 2, 2020. Drew Angerer/Getty

A brief history of presidents disclosing – or trying to hide – health problems

President Trump was direct in announcing he had COVID-19. But presidents in the past have been very good at deceiving the public about the state of their health. Which direction will Trump go now?
A coyote in Vancouver, B.C. Rodent pesticides in large cities kill and adversely affect the health of urban wildlife. (Shutterstock)

Toxic cities: Urban wildlife affected by exposure to pollutants

Urban wildlife are exposed to more pollutants than wildlife living in natural areas. In addition to causing death, these pollutants can affect animals’ development and reproduction.
About 23,000 companies went out of business in 2017. Reuters/Nick Zieminkski

How corporate bankruptcy works

A bankruptcy filing always means there’s not enough money to go around, but the process ensures both debtors and creditors are protected.
Many parents object to vaccination for religious reasons, while others may file for exemptions for convenience. Africa Studios/Shutterstock.com

A proposal to reduce vaccine exemptions while respecting rights of conscience

Recent measles outbreaks show the dangers of not vaccinating – and the importance of vaccination. Is there a way to accommodate those religiously opposed to vaccination and minimize other exemptions?

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