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University of Guelph

The University of Guelph is ranked as one of Canada’s top comprehensive universities because of our commitment to student learning and innovative research. We are dedicated to cultivating the essentials for our quality of life - water, food, environment, animal and human health, community, commerce, culture and learning. The University community also shares a profound sense of social responsibility, an obligation to address global issues and a concern for international development.

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Displaying 61 - 80 of 346 articles

Community members from Blueberry River First Nations collect STREAM samples in Fort St. John, B.C. (Raegan Mallinson/Living Lakes Canada)

Healthy rivers: Communities use DNA tool to keep tabs on freshwater quality

In Canada, watersheds are vast and often inaccessible, making it difficult to monitor the health of these ecosystems. A new tool helps communities collect data to assess the state of Canada’s rivers.
Tamara Dus, director of University Health Network Safety Services, administers a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine in Toronto. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

5 factors that could dictate the success or failure of the COVID-19 vaccine rollout

The arrival of COVID-19 vaccines has raised hope for an end to the pandemic. Hopefully that’s true, but there are variables. Here are some factors that could affect the success of the vaccine rollout.
Tampa, Fla., is hosting Sunday’s Super Bowl football game, despite the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

Why the risk of attending the Super Bowl in Tampa during the pandemic might be too great

Public health officials and politicians have access to the same data on COVID-19 cases, deaths and transmission, but might arrive at different conclusions.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Joe Biden, U.S. vice president at the time, walk down the Hall of Honour on Parliament Hill in Ottawa in December 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Patrick Doyle

What Biden’s presidency means for Canada-U.S. agri-food trade

Closer political ties between Joe Biden and Justin Trudeau likely means a more constructive and co-operative approach to solving challenges between the two countries in the agri-food sector.
Both governments and community organizations promote Robert Burns suppers. Here, an official United Kingdom government photo shows the haggis brought in at the British Prime Minister’s residence, Jan. 22, 2018. (Number 10/Flickr)

How new and ‘auld’ acquaintances are celebrating Scotland’s national bard on Robbie Burns Day

Both Burns and the suppers that celebrate him have proven remarkably malleable symbols worldwide of the Scottish nation and Scottish hospitality.
Canadian athlete Finn Wakeling of the whitewater slalom team member is among those training in anticipation of the Tokyo Olympics. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Marissa Tiel

Tokyo Olympics: An ethical approach will determine whether athletes should get vaccinated ahead of the public

As COVID-19 vaccines roll out, a debate about whether athletes should be prioritized over more vulnerable populations has emerged.
This is not a wok: Japanese musician Natsuki Tamura explores sounds at an online global festival of improvisation, IF 2020. (Ajay Heble/IF 2020)

3 lessons from musical improvisation to help navigate 2021

Improvisation asks us to trust that surprise will teach us something. As we enter a new year and a post-pandemic landscape, musical improvisation offers inspiration.
Players for the Connecticut Sun and the Las Vegas Aces square off during basketball’s WNBA semi-final in September 2020 in Bradenton, Fla. (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack)

What pro sports should learn from resilient women athletes post-pandemic

Women athletes and pro sports leagues are doing more with less, seizing the moment and expectations during the COVID-19 pandemic. When the crisis passes, professional sport should follow their lead.
Could the Chateau Laurier be your new office? THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Stressed out working from home? Consider a hotel day pass

People working from home, especially parents, are stressed out during the COVID-19 pandemic. Hotels, meantime, have taken a huge economic hit. Here’s why hotels should market to remote workers.
A nurse at the Royal Free Hospital in London simulates the administration of the Pfizer vaccine on Dec. 4, 2020 to support staff training ahead of the rollout in the United Kingdom. (Yui Mok/Pool Photo via AP)

Which age group — old or young — should get the COVID-19 vaccine first may depend on timing

If supplies of COVID-19 vaccine are initially limited, who should be vaccinated first? A mathematical model shows when and why it’s best to start with the young, and when older people should go first.
A teacher holds a child as young women learn business skills at Centre D'Apprentissage Feminin (C.A.FE.) in Bamako, Mali, Africa in June 2018. The school is funded by the Canadian NGO Education internationale, a co-operative offering exchange and development services in education. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Sean Kilpatrick

COVID-19 is stifling NGO efforts to promote gender equality when it’s most needed

COVID-19 has presented an opportunity to increase gender equality both in Canada and worldwide. Rebuilding with women at the forefront will help communities succeed post-pandemic.
The Fairmont Royal York Hotel in Toronto. After the SARS pandemic in 2003, Toronto hotels faced a recovery period. (Shutterstock)

SARS didn’t prepare the hospitality industry for the prolonged impact of COVID-19

After SARS in 2003, an effort was made by Toronto’s tourism and hospitality industries to stimulate the sector’s recovery. But measures weren’t put in place for future pandemics.
Mink can be readily infected with SARS-CoV-2 and then pass the virus to humans. (Shutterstock)

The mink link: How COVID-19 mutations in animals affect human health and vaccine effectiveness

In the disturbing scenario of human-to-mink-to-human COVID-19 transmission, the virus may mutate in mink prior to re-infecting people. That possibility makes vaccine design even more crucial.
Farmers, cottagers and small business organizations are among the groups clamouring for better broadband in Ontario, especially in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. (Pexels)

Building back better, during and after COVID-19, with faster broadband

The need for much-improved internet connectivity exists across Canada. Will the Ontario government’s recent announcement of $1 billion and the federal government’s announcement of the Universal Broadband Fund of $1.75 billion for improved broadband be enough to make a difference?

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