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University of Massachusetts Lowell

The University of Massachusetts Lowell (also known as UMass Lowell or UML) is an urban public research university in Lowell, Massachusetts, United States, and part of the University of Massachusetts system.

With more than 1,100 faculty members and nearly 17,000 students, it is the largest university in the Merrimack Valley and the second-largest public institution in the state behind UMass Amherst.

The university offers 120 bachelor’s, 39 master’s and 33 doctoral degree programs, including nationally recognised programs in science, engineering and technology. Academically, UMass Lowell is organised into six schools and colleges: College of Fine Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences; College of Health Sciences; College of Sciences; the Francis College of Engineering; the Graduate School of Education; and the Manning School of Business.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 78 articles

The American Dream and Promise Act, also known as House Resolution 6, would create a path to citizenship for immigrant ‘Dreamers’ – but it has to pass the Senate first. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Citizenship for the ‘Dreamers’? 6 essential reads on DACA and immigration reform

The House passed a bill creating a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants who came to the US as children. Here's what you need to know about the Dreamers and DACA.
Is Sen. Marco Rubio, espousing a polished populism, the future of the GOP? Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A less Trumpy version of Trumpism might be the future of the Republican Party

Donald Trump's ticket to the White House was a coarse version of populism. Will his successors in the GOP be different – or simply present a more polished version of his antagonistic rhetoric?
Many of the people who broke into the U.S. Capitol building on Jan. 6 carried cellphones, which can be tracked, and posted photos of their activities on social media. Photo by Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

How law enforcement is using technology to track down people who attacked the US Capitol building

Facial recognition, social media and location tracking give law enforcement a leg up in a monumental investigation.
Militia members associated with the Three Percenters movement conducting a military drill in Flovilla, Ga., in 2016, days after Trump’s election. After his 2020 defeat, Three Percenters were involved in the Jan. 6, 2021 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. Mohammed Elshamy/Anadolu Agency/Getty Image

Police, soldiers bring lethal skill to militia campaigns against US government

A leaked database shows at least 10% of the far-right Oath Keepers militia is active police or military – people professionally trained in using weapons and conducting sophisticated operations.
Llevar las vacunas a zonas rurales y de difícil acceso es fundamental por razones éticas y de salud pública. Hector Roqueta Rivero/Moment via Getty Images

Vacunas covid-19: La cadena de suministro en frío no llega a todas partes, lo que impide su administración equitativa

Hasta ahora, las únicas vacunas COVID-19 autorizadas para su uso deben mantenerse congeladas. Pero hay muchos lugares en el mundo que no pueden mantener una cadena de suministro en frío.
Getting vaccines to rural and hard-to-reach areas is critical for public health and ethical reasons. Hector Roqueta Rivero/Moment via Getty Images

The cold supply chain can’t reach everywhere – that’s a big problem for equitable COVID-19 vaccination

So far, the only COVID-19 vaccines authorized for use need to be kept frozen. But there are many places in the world that can't support a cold supply chain.
People gather outside the U.S. Supreme Court building as news spread of Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Sept. 18 death. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

3 ways a 6-3 Supreme Court would be different

A 6-3 conservative court will hear a broader range of controversial cases, shift interpretations of individual rights and put more pressure on local democracy to make policy decisions.
Sending in the feds to quell unrest often increases conflict on the ground, as it did this summer in Portland, Ore. Nathan Howard/Getty Images

Federal agents sent to Kenosha, but history shows militarized policing in cities can escalate violence and trigger conflict

Kenosha is the latest US city to see federal agents patrolling its protests. History suggests that supplanting the local police with a militarized national force rarely works out well.
Voters in Nashville, Tennessee, faced long lines in March 2020. AP Photo/Mark Humphrey

The right to vote is not in the Constitution

The framers of the Constitution never mentioned a right to vote. They didn't forget. They intentionally left it out.
On Dec. 19, 2016, Colorado elector Micheal Baca, in T-shirt second from left, cast his electoral ballot for John Kasich, though Hillary Clinton had won his state’s popular vote. AP Photo/Brennan Linsley

Supreme Court reforms, strengthens Electoral College

Electors may not vote their consciences, which means the Electoral College will continue to operate how most Americans think it does.
When blocking a highway, who is a domestic terrorist and who is a peaceful protester? And does it make a legal difference? David Ryder/Getty Images

The ‘domestic terrorist’ designation won’t stop extremism

Legally designating domestic extremist groups as terrorist organizations – as some in the US advocate now – will have limited benefits, if any at all.
On Dec. 19, 2016, Colorado elector Micheal Baca, in T-shirt second from left, cast his electoral ballot for John Kasich, though Hillary Clinton had won his state’s popular vote. AP Photo/Brennan Linsley

Supreme Court to decide the future of the Electoral College

Many Americans are surprised to learn that Electoral College members do not necessarily have to pick the candidate their state's voters favored. Or do they?

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