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University of Missouri-Kansas City

The University of Missouri-Kansas City was created when the University of Kansas City became a part of the University of Missouri System on July 25, 1963.

In 1929, Kansas City businessman and philanthropist William Volker donated 40.8 acres to the University of Kansas City. In 1931, Volker acquired and donated the Dickey mansion, which would house the first library, classrooms, cafeteria and administrative offices. UKC’s first classes began in 1933 with 17 instructors and 265 students enrolled. In 1936, 80 students became UKC’s first graduating class.

In 1938, Kansas City School of Law merged with UKC to form the Law School, and in 1941, the Kansas City-Western Dental College, founded in 1881, joined UKC. Today, UMKC School of Dentistry is the only dental school in the state of Missouri.

The university’s dedication to the arts was born in 1942, with the construction of the Fine Arts Center. The Kansas City Conservatory of Music joined UKC in 1959. In 1979, the James C. Olson Performing Arts Center was completed. Known as the “PAC,” it’s home to the UMKC Conservatory of Music and Dance and the Kansas City Repertory Theatre, helping UMKC become an integral part of Kansas City’s cultural character.

The UMKC School of Medicine was founded in 1971, offering a unique and revolutionary six-year combined bachelor/M.D. program. Located on the Hospital Hill campus, the Medical School has now graduated over 3,000 M.D.s.

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