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University of Pretoria

The University is a values-based, research-intensive university that equips its students to succeed in a rapidly changing world by providing students with inquiry-led training and learning opportunities. The University of Pretoria’s long-term Strategic Plan captures the essence of a shared vision, aiming to sustain UP’s quality and relevance as a university that is firmly rooted in Africa, and to harness its existing and future potential for diversity. UP strives to ensure that it is recognised in the global marketplace of knowledge production.

UP has nine faculties and a business school: - Economic and Management Sciences - Education - Engineering, Built Environment and Information Technology - Health Sciences - Humanities - Law - Natural and Agricultural Sciences - Theology - Veterinary Science (the only faculty of its kind in South Africa) - the Gordon Institute of Business Science (GIBS).

The University of Pretoria came into existence in 1908 as the Pretoria branch of the Transvaal University College. The College became a fully-fledged university in 1930 and the colloquial name Tuks, or Tukkies, was derived from the acronym TUC for Transvaal University College. UP’s current facilities portfolio consists of more than 790 buildings and structures spread over 33 sites located on six campuses that cover 1100 hectares of land. In the 106 years of its existence the University has produced more than 230 000 alumni. The University prides itself on producing well-rounded, creative graduates, responsible, productive citizens and future leaders. Great emphasis is placed on student life and support as well as the advancement of sport, art, culture and music.

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South Africa’s finance minister Tito Mboweni says the IMF loan will limit the country’s economic vulnerabilities which have been exacerbated by COVID-19. Gallo Images/Brenton Geach

The IMF’s $4bn loan for South Africa: the pros, cons and potential pitfalls

The IMF loan does not impose any conditions over and above what is in South African law on how the funds can be used; it only seems to expect the country to implement policies already announced.
Hands-on monitoring is key to fighting many plant diseases. Edwin Remsberg/VWPics/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Why it’s so critical to continuously monitor and manage plant diseases

Plant diseases require as much attention now as ever to ensure that food systems are in place in the next season. There are also serious implications for forestry and the environment more broadly.
Surfers walk on the beach while the fire continues to blaze on the mountains behind them in 2015 in Cape Town, South Africa. Shelley Christians/The Times/Gallo Images/Getty Images

Air pollution and temperature: bad for your heart and blood vessels

Until now, the interaction of temperature and air pollution and its contribution to these diseases hasn't been studied conclusively in South Africa - or anywhere on the African continent.

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