Menu Close

University of Regina

The University of Regina—with campuses located on Treaty 4 and Treaty 6 territories, the ancestral lands of the Cree, Saulteaux, Dakota, and Lakota nations and the homeland of the Métis—is a comprehensive, mid-sized university that traces its roots back to the creation of Regina College in 1911. With an established reputation for excellence and innovative programs, it is ranked one of the top young universities in the world and boasts an active academic community that includes more than 15,000 students who study within 10 faculties, 25 academic departments/schools, 18 research centres and institutes, and three federated colleges: Campion College, First Nations University of Canada, and Luther College. Home to a thriving research community, University of Regina scholars push the boundaries of knowledge at a world-class level and make a meaningful impact in the lives of people at home and around the world.

Links

Displaying 1 - 20 of 62 articles

Colten Boushie’s family fought for accountability after the racist actions of the RCMP as they investigated the death of her son who was shot and killed by a local farmer. Here she holds up his photo during the 2018 trial. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Liam Richards

Watchdog report into RCMP investigation of Colten Boushie’s death confirms police racism

Years of research show that Indigenous, Black and racialized people experience over-policing but also, under-policing, as was the case with the RCMP investigation into Colten Boushie's death in 2016.
Élèves du Pensionnat indien de Metlakatla, en Colombie-Britannique. (William James Topley. Bibliothèque et Archives Canada, C-015037)

L’action collective réglée, il ne faut pas oublier les histoires des survivants des pensionnats autochtones

Les archives publiques sont précieuses pour comprendre comment se crée la mémoire collective. Si l’on ne prête pas attention aux voix et aux expériences autochtones, le regard colonial perdurera.
Students of the Metlakatla Indian Residential School, B.C. (William James Topley. Library and Archives Canada, C-015037)

Residential school survivors’ stories and experiences must be remembered as class action settlement finishes

The destruction of IAP residential school records and media reports that continually emphasize compensation will ensure that if remembered, the process will be remembered through a colonial gaze.
Québec Premier François Legault chairs a premiers virtual news conference as premiers Brian Pallister, Manitoba, and Doug Ford, Ontario, are seen on screen on March 4, 2021 in Montréal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

The disingenuous demands of Canada’s premiers for $28 billion in health-care funding

The premiers are demanding more funding from the federal government for health care. Yet more cash without real change would be the real betrayal of Canada's public health-care system.
Under tight security, Libyans mark the 10th anniversary of their 2011 uprising that led to the overthrow and killing of longtime ruler Moammar Gadhafi in Martyrs Square, Tripoli, Libya. (AP Photo/Hazem Ahmed)

Ten years after the Arab Spring, Libya has another chance for peace

Ten years after the Arab Spring, hope has given way to turmoil as Libyans have watched duelling governments and armed groups fight over the country's oil riches. Is a new chance for peace afoot?
Gathering on the land: Indigenous ways of knowing can ensure that communities reclaim and promote health and healing. (Melody Morton-Ninomiya)

Indigenous community research partnerships can help address health inequities

Many researchers may lack resources to guide them in conducting research that is equitable, inclusive and respectful of diverse Indigenous knowledge, ethics, practice and research sovereignty.
Students watch as a teacher participates in a solidarity march with colleagues to raise awareness about COVID-19 cases at École Woodward Hill Elementary School, in Surrey, B.C., Feb. 23, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Provinces should act fast to avert a teacher shortage now and after COVID-19

Provinces have struggled to mitigate the COVID-19 health concerns of full-time and substitute teachers. The need for substitutes has increased, but fewer are available.
L’eau dévale du barrage hydroélectrique Carillon au Québec. LA PRESSE CANADIENNE/Ryan Remiorz

Comment le Canada peut fournir une énergie propre et fiable grâce aux macroréseaux électriques

Le secteur de l’électricité jouera un rôle clé dans la réduction des gaz à effet de serre. Améliorer le transport sur de longues distances permettrait de distribuer une énergie propre à moindre coût.
Water rushes through the Carillon Hydro electric dam in Québec. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Why Canada should invest in ‘macrogrids’ for greener, more reliable electricity

The electricity sector is expected to play a key role in Canada's push to net-zero emissions. Enhancing long-distance transmission can be lower the cost of providing clean and reliable electricity.
Ministries of education need to embed ongoing anti-racist training into their teacher education programs. Short-term anti-bias training has little impact. Here, a school school in Toronto. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Short-term anti-racist training is not enough to counter systemic racism in Canadian education

COVID-19 has exposed how systemic racism affects the lives of many racialized students in Canada. But what are some possible solutions?
Olivia Wheeler, Taiwo Afolabi and Tianxu Zhao perform a play in honour of UN World Refugee Day, June 20, 2017, at Victoria City Hall. (John Threfall)

Theatre shows how the art of inclusion can help build a better Canada in 2021

Safe spaces for conversations around immigrants’ experiences are important because identity is central to diversity and inclusion in the 21st century. Theatre can be a tool for community engagement.
The Paris Agreement on climate change, signed on Dec. 12, 2015, by almost 200 states, was hailed as the turning point to keep global warming in check. Progress, however, has been insufficient. (UNclimate change/flickr)

The Paris Agreement at 5: Time’s running out. How to get the world back on track to meet its climate goals

The Paris Agreement set countries on a path to limit global warming. Five years on, some progress has been made, but not enough. Decarbonizing the economy will take leadership and imagination.

Authors

More Authors