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University of Richmond

The University of Richmond, a liberal arts college located in Richmond, Virginia, is committed to educating in an intellectually vibrant community dedicated to the holistic development of students. The University offers both the close-knit community of a small college and opportunities that rival those of larger institutions, including a strong Division I athletics program and the nation’s only Spider mascot.

Richmond’s learning and research environment is grounded in the liberal arts and is enriched by its array of schools, with a singular integration of learning and scholarship across campus. Richmond enrolls approximately 3,600 traditional undergraduate students in the School of Arts & Sciences, Robins School of Business, and Jepson School of Leadership Studies, as well as 1,000 students in the School of Law (JD and LLM), School of Professional & Continuing Studies (graduate, undergraduate, and certificate programs) and Robins School of Business (MBA) programs.

The University is committed to access and affordability and is one of about 80 institutions in the country that is both need-blind and meets full need. The Richmond Guarantee guarantees each undergraduate student up to $5,000 to participate in a faculty-mentored research project or an internship.

Learn more at richmond.edu.

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María Elena Paredes, presidenta del comité de vigilancia de Sawawo Hito 40, enseña imágenes satelitales que demuestran la deforestación de la selva amazónica. Reynaldo Vela/USAID

Defensores indígenas resisten entre los caminos ilegales y la supervivencia de la selva Amazónica – las elecciones pueden ser decisivas

Durante la pandemia de COVID-19, la selva Amazónica ha visto un crecimiento explosivo de deforestación y caminos ilegales. Las elecciones de octubre en Brasil y Perú pueden ser un punto de inflexión.
Maria Elena Paredes, coordinator of the Community Vigilance Committee for the Ashéninka community of Sawawo Hito 40, points to satellite images showing deforestation. Reynaldo Vela/USAID

Indigenous defenders stand between illegal roads and survival of the Amazon rainforest – Brazil’s runoff election could be a turning point

Illegal roads have brought deforestation, fire and other environmental damage to the Amazon. The results of the 2022 presidential runoff could have a major impact for the future.
Chinese stars Xie Na, far right, and Huang Xiaoming, second from left, were among those reposting the ‘One China’ message. VCG via Getty Images

How Chinese celebrities are amplifying official policy on Taiwan, pushing ‘One China’ messages to millions of fans online

Chinese celebrities have become increasingly politically active on social media over the years – in part to help advance their careers.
Cash is pretty convenient. Dilok Klaisataporn/EyeEm via Getty Images

Why does money exist?

Paying for the stuff you want with currency is way easier than relying on chairs you made or chickens you raised.
The U.S. could soon catch up to the European Union in protecting people’s data privacy. Teera Konakan/Moment via Getty Images

A new US data privacy bill aims to give you more control over information collected about you – and make businesses change how they handle data

Data collection is big business in the US, but a bipartisan data privacy bill rapidly moving through Congress promises to affect the information websites, social media platforms and all other businesses collect.
Ugandans watch the start of the International Criminal Court trial of former child soldier-turned-warlord Dominic Ongwen. Isaac Kasamani/AFP via Getty Images

Slavery and war are tightly connected – but we had no idea just how much until we crunched the data

Armed conflicts today involve slavery in many different forms, from forced marriage to child soldiers.
Sebuah molekul nanographene dicitrakan oleh mikroskop gaya atom nonkontak. Patrik Tschudin/gross3HR/Wikimedia Commons

Seperti apa bentuk molekul?

Seorang fisikawan menjelaskan bagaimana atom menyusun dirinya menjadi molekul – dan bagaimana para ilmuwan dapat menggambarkan potongan-potongan kecil materi yang membentuk segala sesuatu di sekitarmu
The goal of the public health emergency declaration is to prevent the monkeypox virus from becoming a widespread threat to public health. ALIOUI Mohammed Elamine/iStock via Getty Images

Monkeypox is now a national public health emergency in the U.S. – an epidemiologist explains what this means

Declaring monkeypox a national health emergency will allow the U.S. government to direct resources and funds where needed to help slow the spread of the virus.
The monkeypox virus, shown in this illustration, can be transmitted through close contact between people. Thom Leach/Science Photos Library via Getty Images

Why declaring monkeypox a global health emergency is a preventative step – not a reason for panic

By late July 2022, monkeypox was present in more than 70 countries with significant spread in certain communities. As a result, the World Health Organization began taking steps to fight the virus.
Monkeypox is caused by the monkeypox virus, which are the ovals and circles seen in this electron microscope image of the skin of a person infected with monkeypox. Cynthia S. Goldsmith, Russell Regnery/CDC

Is monkeypox a pandemic? An epidemiologist explains why it isn’t likely to become as widespread as COVID-19, but is worth watching

The monkeypox virus, which is commonly found in West and Central Africa, is now causing many infections in the U.S., Europe and Latin America.
A nanographene molecule imaged by noncontact atomic force microscopy. Patrik Tschudin/gross3HR/Wikimedia Commons

What do molecules look like?

A physicist explains how atoms arrange themselves into molecules – and how scientists are able to image these tiny bits of matter that make up everything around you.
Mississippi state legislators review an option for redrawing the state’s voting districts at the state Capitol in Jackson on March 29, 2022. AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis

Supreme Court allows states to use unlawfully gerrymandered congressional maps in the 2022 midterm elections

A ruling by the US Supreme Court to allow unlawful maps to be used in the midterm elections will affect who gets elected to the House of Representatives and may determine control of Congress.

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