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University of Saskatchewan

Set in an architecturally stunning century-old campus in Saskatoon, the U of S is the core of a dynamic research hub working to address critical challenges faced by people locally and around the world. World-class research centres include global institutes for food and water security, the Canadian Light Source synchrotron, the Crop Development Centre, and the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Centre (VIDO-InterVac), plus an impressive array of national and provincial bio-science research labs. With stellar research teams and annual research income of more than $200 million, the university has earned a place among the U15 group of Canada’s top research universities.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 154 articles

Moments of intimate playing, learning and teaching are among the ways that immigrant parents extend and expand their home languages with their children. (Rajesh Rajput/Unsplash)

5 ways immigrant parents support children’s home language learning

When schools honour and learn from immigrant parents’ knowledge, they support more opportunities to enhance young children’s linguistic, cultural and social experiences.
While Canadian universities are paying more attention to anti-racism and equity, more must be done to incorporate those values into the education students receive. (Shutterstock)

In times of racial injustice, university education should not be ‘neutral’

Universities can ensure students in all disciplines are learning how to contribute to a world that they and future generations want to live in.
The children’s book, Little Louis, tells the story of a young boy preparing for his COVID-19 vaccination. (Morning Star Lodge)

Indigenous children’s book ‘Little Louis’ aims to curb COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy with a culturally relevant story

There is an urgent need to combat historically fuelled vaccine hesitancy within Indigenous communities. The best way to do this is through evidence-based knowledge and community-led work.
People march in the streets in Ottawa during a rally to demand an independent investigation into Canada’s crimes against Indigenous Peoples, including those at Indian Residential Schools. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

Transitional justice for Indigenous Peoples should be a key federal election issue

The aim of transitional justice is to usher in a peaceful society after mass atrocity, periods of systemic human rights violations and violent authoritarian regimes. It should be a Canadian priority.
When the messenger is distrusted, adherence to public health advice fails. Anti-mask protesters hold signs during a demonstration against measures taken by public health authorities to curb the spread of COVID-19 in St. Thomas, Ont., in November 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Geoff Robins

Public health campaigns can be ruined by the personal conduct of politicians

When politicians disregard public health directives, new research shows it causes the public to distrust governments’ handling of crises like the COVID-19 pandemic.
Greyhound has permanently shut down its intercity bus service in Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld 

Canada needs a national public transportation system — here’s why

Many communities in Canada currently lack intercity and regional transportation. A national public transportation system would improve connectedness between cities and access to essential services.
La pharmacienne Barbara Violo range toutes les fioles vides du vaccin AstraZeneca qu'elle a fournies aux clients d'une pharmacie indépendante de Toronto. La Presse Canadienne/Nathan Denette

Deuxième dose d’AstraZeneca : dois-je recevoir le même vaccin ou choisir Pfizer ou Moderna ?

Des centaines de milliers de Canadiens ont reçu une injection du vaccin d’AstraZeneca en première dose. Ils ont maintenant le choix pour leur deuxième dose : AstraZeneca à nouveau, ou Pfizer/Moderna ?
Pharmacist Barbara Violo arranges all the empty vials of the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine that she has provided to customers at an independent pharmacy in Toronto. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

AstraZeneca second dose: Should I get the same vaccine or choose Pfizer or Moderna?

Hundreds of thousands of Canadians got a shot of AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine for their first dose. They now have a choice for their second dose: AstraZeneca again, or Pfizer or Moderna mRNA vaccine?
Eating less animal proteins may help reduce the risk of future zoonotic viruses. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman)

How plant-based diets could help prevent the next COVID-19

Pandemic viruses arise from raising, harvesting and eating animals. Policy strategy for averting the next pandemic should include supporting those already seeking to make plant-based dietary changes.
The COVID-19 pandemic has shown that many jobs can be performed remotely. It’s time to consider moving federal goverment positions into other regions of the country. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Is it time to move Ottawa out of Ottawa?

If work doesn’t need to be done in Ottawa-area offices, does it need to be done in Ottawa at all?
Vanquishing the enemy? People stand in a quick moving line up at a mass vaccination centre during the COVID-19 pandemic in Mississauga, Ont., on May 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Confusing AstraZeneca warfare messaging: Destroy the COVID-19 enemy fast, but wait

Public officials are telling us simultaneously to move swiftly on vaccination and also to make thoughtful, reasoned choices about which vaccine we get. These messages are confusing and frustrating.
A helicopter drops water on a forest fire in Alaska. Michael Risinger/U.S. Army National Guard

As extreme fires transform Alaska’s boreal forest, deciduous trees put a brake on carbon loss and how fast the forest burns

A new study finds more deciduous trees like aspen are growing in after severe fires in the region, and that has some unexpected impacts.
Part of Gros Morne National Park in western Newfoundland is seen in June 2017. Tourism is critically important for many areas of rural Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Colin Perkel

Rural vs. urban Canada: No ‘one size fits all’ COVID-19 recovery

Misconceptions of rural realities can have serious implications. Better use of data can help avoid this and lead to policies that will help rural communities recover in the post-pandemic.
The AstraZeneca vaccine was 70 per cent effective against symptomatic COVID-19 infection in a large multinational study, and recently reported 76 per cent overall efficacy against symptomatic COVID-19 in another large study done primarily in the United States. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods

AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine FAQ: Why do the age recommendations keep changing? Does it cause VIPIT blood clots? Is it effective against variants?

With changing recommendations about AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine making headlines, many people have questions about its use.
A person sits on a tripod platform high above the street as protesters occupy an intersection during a demonstration to call for government action to on climate change in Vancouver in February 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Climate action, job creation are top post-pandemic priorities for Canadians

As Canada emerges from the pandemic, creating jobs and achieving full employment are top priorities. Relegated to the back burner are balanced budgets and reducing debt.
Premier Scott Moe speaks after a media tour of the COVID-19 mass immunization clinic and drive-thru immunization space in Regina on Feb. 18, 2021. The province also has mobile immunization vehicles to distribute the vaccine to remote communities. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Michael Bell

Mass COVID-19 immunization: Ensuring equitable access to vaccination

One important metric by which we can measure the success of our public health system: Ensuring everyone has access to immunization in their community.
The EUV-SK1, developed by One Health Medical Technologies with subject matter experts from the University of Saskatchewan. (RMD Engineering, Inc.)

Keeping it local: The story behind a made-in-Saskatchewan COVID-19 emergency-use ventilator

How a veterinarian and a law professor joined a multidisciplinary team to help produce a made-in-Saskatchewan emergency-use ventilator during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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