University of the Western Cape

The University of the Western Cape is a national university, alert to its African and international context as it strives to be a place of quality, a place to grow. It is committed to excellence in teaching, learning and research, to nurturing the cultural diversity of South Africa, and to responding in critical and creative ways to the needs of a society in transition.

Drawing on its proud experience in the liberation struggle, the university is aware of a distinctive academic role in helping build an equitable and dynamic society. In particular it aims to: advance and protect the independence of the academic enterprise.

Design curricular and research programmes appropriate to its southern African context.

Further global perspectives among its staff and students, thereby strengthening intellectual life and contributing to South Africa’s reintegration in the world community.

Assist educationally disadvantaged students gain access to higher education and succeed in their studies.

Nurture and use the abilities of all in the university community.

Develop effective structures and conventions of governance, which are democratic, transparent and accountable.

Seek racial and gender equality and contribute to helping the historically marginalised participate fully in the life of the nation.

Encourage and provide opportunities for lifelong learning through programmes and courses.

Help conserve and explore the environmental and cultural resources of the southern African region, and to encourage a wide awareness of these resources in the community.

Co-operate fully with other stakeholders to develop an excellent, and therefore transformed, higher education system.

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Displaying 101 - 115 of 115 articles

Complementary and alternative medicine has been recognised in South Africa but is not yet fully integrated into the country’s health care system. shutterstock

Why alternative medicine should be integrated into conventional health care

Complementary and alternative medicine could alleviate many of the access problems within primary health care in South Africa's rural areas if it was fully integrated into the system.
A scene from the film ‘The Vow’, which is being shown at the Africa World Documentary Film Festival that aims to depict African stories through documentary. Photo supplied

Experiences of African people across the world brought to life through film

Cape Town's screening of the Africa World Documentary Film Festival provides a platform for debate, and shows how documentary films clarify and complicate the answers.
The rise of the BRICS countries is a case of political life imitating economic art. Reuters

BRICS herald new era in international political economy

The global recognition of BRICS – Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa – has not only led to their greater global political influence, but also reinforced their regional leadership.
South Africa has seen an upsurge in protests recently, but can it really be said to be less peaceful than dictatorships such as Equatorial Guinea and Gambia? Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

Why the Global Peace Index needs be read with scepticism

Indexes such as the Global Peace Index are used by a wide variety of players to make decisions ranging from investments to providing other support. But do they deserve this level of credibility?
The more than two million houses built by the state and transferred to the residents as freehold property, many with solar energy, are the most visible of the Freedom Charter’s achievements. Reuters

The legacy of South Africa’s Freedom Charter 60 years later

The Freedom Charter, adopted at a meeting in Soweto on June 25-26 1955, triggered a paradigm shift in thinking about the democratic rights of black South Africans and their protection under the law.
High food prices means that many South Africans are less concerned about how to feed their families members than making healthy food choices. Siphiwe Sibeko /Reuters

What’s in your purse dictates what’s on your plate

At least 40% of South Africans are suffering malnutrition because they eat too little nutrients to sustain health.
Mmusi Maimane was elected leader of the Democratic Alliance at the party’s federal congress on Sunday. EPA/Kim Ludbrook

First black leader breathes life into South African opposition

With the election of Mmusi Maimane as leader, the Democratic Alliance, like the ANC, calculated that a black rather than coloured leader is needed for victory at the national level.
Looks like five more years. Wikimedia Commons

Sham or not, election flaws unlikely to unseat Mugabe

The recent elections in Zimbabwe were always likely to be problematic. Despite the hope of former South African president Thabo Mbeki in 2007 that his mediation efforts would lead to an vote that was “conducted…

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