University of Toronto

Established in 1827, the University of Toronto has one of the strongest research and teaching faculties in North America, presenting top students at all levels with an intellectual environment unmatched in depth and breadth on any other Canadian campus.

With more than 75,000 students across three campuses (St. George, Mississauga and Scarborough) and over 450,000 alumni active in every region of the world, U of T’s influence is felt in every area of human endeavour.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 444 articles

The interruption to young children’s learning is happening precisely at a time when developmental gains matter most. (Shutterstock)

Coronavirus school closures could widen inequities for our youngest students

Remote contact with families in the coronavirus emergency is critical, but learning on a screen is not how young children will gain the foundational and developmental skills they need.
Despite an increasinly online-only world, libraries can still reveal the lives of the people who once owned the books within them. (Shutterstock)

As libraries go digital, paper books still have a lot to offer us

What stories will we tell about library collections in the future? As digitization takes over libraries, margin notes and scribbles are still part of the research process.
A seasonal migrant worker is seen in the Niagara area earlier this spring. (Jane Andres, Niagara Workers Welcome)

Coronavirus: Canada stigmatizes, jeopardizes essential migrant workers

Migrant workers are not inherently more vulnerable to COVID-19, nor more likely to be carrying it than Canadians. Yet our treatment of them this year stigmatizes them and puts them at risk.
For Black birdwatchers, the outdoors is a relaxing space but not one free from racism and discrimination. (Shutterstock)

What you should know about Black birders

As Black birdwatcher Christian Cooper learned in New York City's Central Park, nature is seen as a white space and Black birdwatching as an aberration.
New research suggests many Canadians cannot afford to forgo public transit during the COVID-19 pandemic — or ever. Jed Dela Cruz/Unsplash

Giving up public transit during the coronavirus is a luxury many Canadians can’t afford

Many of Canada's residents, including essential workers, have no choice but to ride transit. Service cuts may cripple their access to essential destinations if governments do not intervene.
A man marks places in a mosque for worshippers to maintain distance during prayers after the government relaxed the weeks-long lockdown that was enforced to curb the spread of the coronavirus, in Peshawar, Pakistan. (AP Photo/Muhammad Sajjad)

Pakistan’s religious leaders defied coronavirus mosque restrictions then compromised

The ulema's reaction to the government's decision to limit access to mosques — and the civil society's counter-reaction — should be viewed in terms of challenges to traditional theism in modernity.
A migrant covered with a blanket passes in front of dumped garbage outside the Moria refugee camp on the island of Lesbos, Greece, Jan. 21, 2020. (AP Photo/Aggelos Barai)

Refugees at increased risk of coronavirus due to barriers to healthcare

Based on how other diseases have moved through refugee camps, there is an urgent need to protect refugees in camps and informal settlements from COVID-19.
Les mères ressentent la pression de devoir à la fois travailler et assumer la plupart des tâches parentales. Shutterstock

Pandémie : les femmes font moins de recherche que les hommes

La fermeture des écoles et des services de garde en raison de la pandémie a eu un impact sur les mères universitaires. Elles sont moins en mesure de mener des recherches et d’écrire des articles.

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