University of Winnipeg

The University of Winnipeg received its charter in 1967, but our roots are deep, with more than 140 years of nurturing global citizens. Located on Treaty One land, in the Métis homeland, we are anchored in one of the most ethnically diverse communities in Canada. We proudly reflect this reality as one of the top universities in the country for Indigenous participation. Whether science students are engaged in undergraduate research, business students are exploring social enterprise, arts students are engaged in human rights and ending homelessness on our streets, or education students are tutoring incarcerated young offenders – we remain a place that grows leaders and encourages them to make an impact. Our faculty researchers and scholars are tackling relevant and contemporary issues like climate change, Indigenous health, food security, community development, poverty, and refugee settlement.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 47 articles

Lin-Manuel Miranda, center, and the cast of “Hamilton” perform at the Tony Awards in New York on June 12, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, Invision - Evan Agostini

‘Hamilton’ ignores the statesman’s strategy to fund genocidal warfare against Indigenous Peoples

Alexander Hamilton's commitment to a well-funded national army and his support for territorial expansion had grave repercussions for the Indigenous Nations west of the Appalachians.
Both when planning family activities and choosing a child care provider, parents should be mindful of how much physical activity their children are getting. (Shutterstock)

Kids’ physical activity before age 5 matters so much because of the developing brain

When young children are active, their brains and bodies develop the ABCs of "physical literacy," a key developmental foundation. A new program from University of Winnipeg can help.
Doctors reported the first cases of MIS-C in April. Learning more about how SARS-CoV-2 affects children is essential to the safe reopening of communities. (Pexels/August de Richelieu)

Rare multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children linked to coronavirus

A rare new disease syndrome appears to be caused by an overactive immune response in children, often hitting weeks after exposure to the SARS-CoV-2 virus.
Teacher Céline Guérin explains two-metre distancing to students in the school yard of Marie-Derome School in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Que., May 11, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

How to prevent teacher burnout during the coronavirus pandemic

A cross-Canada survey of teachers shows teachers say one of the most stressful aspects of their jobs now is their concern for vulnerable students.
Jean Vanier, founder of L'Arche communities, poses for a photograph after he received the Templeton Prize at St. Martins-in-the-Fields church in London, U.K., in May 2015. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

I once thought Catholic humanist Jean Vanier a hero. Now I’m wrestling with his coercive legacy

Jean Vanier, Catholic founder of L'Arche International, allegedly had abusive sexual relationships. Religious tolerance for the veneration of male leaders may be partly to blame.
A person carries groceries while walking among cyclists on Queen Elizabeth Drive in Ottawa on April 18, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

How to build more resilient cities post-coronavirus

Rebuilding cities post-pandemic will start with neighbourhood hope, and strong social and community planning.
The coronavirus pandemic has led to many people using social media in more positive ways, including video conferencing platforms like Zoom. (Shutterstock)

Who’s Zoomin’ who? How the coronavirus crisis is finally putting the ‘social’ into social media

Social media has become a virtual lifeline during the COVID-19 crisis. How people in isolation are using Zoom and other platforms goes against the notion that social media makes us more anti-social.
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie speaks during a campaign event in Spartanburg, S.C., on Feb. 27, 2020. AP Photo/Matt Rourke

Bernie Sanders: Making socialism cool again

Bernie Sanders is effectively indicting the political economic structure in which the super-rich have amassed extraordinary sums of wealth at the expense of everyone else — and our shared planet.
Countering extremist anti-immigrant and racist attitudes and recruiting in Manitoba requires new approaches. Here, on the right, Hazel Ismail, with No One Is Illegal, calls for Winnipeg to become a sanctuary city, Feb. 3, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods

Communities can combat racism, hate and extremism with education

Manitoba faces pressing facing demands for new ways of forming relationships with young people to counter hate.
Canada’s homeless population has exceeded approximately 35,000 persons. Ev/ Unsplash

A proven way to end homelessness in Canada

In the last decade, Canadian cities have made huge strides in the way policy-makers approach the homeless. The right tool-kit alongside community knowledge can go a long way to curbing homelessness.
Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister manages to keep the red Tories of his caucus happy and appeal to urban voters in Winnipeg in a province where far-right conservatism would not fly. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Manitoba’s pragmatic conservatism may contain lessons for Andrew Scheer

Those hoping to see from Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister the fiery right-wing political rhetoric often employed by other Conservative leaders in Canada will walk away disappointed.
The Progressive Conservative Party of Manitoba under Brian Pallister is expected to return to power in the Sept. 10 election. THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods

Manitoba’s summertime election plays well for Conservatives

Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister called an early election and the summertime campaign will likely help his Progressive Conservative government be re-elected.

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