UNSW

Established in 1949, the University of New South Wales is one of Australia’s leading research and teaching universities, renowned for the quality of its graduates and its commitment to new and creative approaches to education and research.

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A tax incentive coupled with a new fund to support research translation could go a long way toward closing that gap in funding imbalances between medical and non-medical research. John Pryke/AAP

Australia can do a better job of commercialising research – here’s how

A tax incentive coupled with a new fund to support research translation for non-medical research would help Australia lift its game.
Dr Simon Rosenbaum in Gaziantep, Turkey, with participants in an exercise program for Syrian refugees. Simon Rosenbaum

Trust Me, I’m An Expert: ‘Dancing out of depression’ – how Syrian refugees are using exercise to improve mental health

Trust Me, I’m An Expert: how Syrian refugees are using exercise to improve mental health. The Conversation40.1 MB (download)
Last year, two researchers flew to Gaziantep in southern Turkey, where about one in four people are Syrian refugees, to explore how exercise might help improve mental health.
An illustration of the two 20-micrometre-wide vibrating drumheads, each composed of trillions of atoms, in an entangled quantum state of motion. Petja Hyttinen and Olli Hanhirova, ARKH Architects Ltd.

Experiment shows Einstein’s quantum ‘spooky action’ approaches the human scale

We usually think of quantum entanglement in the realm of atomic systems, but now it's been scaled up to relatively massive objects. This opens the door to new kinds of technology.
Ben Quilty, Life vest, Lesbos. 2016, oil on polyester, 60 x 50cm. Australian War Memorial

Essays On Air: can art really make a difference?

Essays on Air: can art really make a difference? The Conversation26.8 MB (download)
Art has always depicted the crimes of our times throughout centuries of wars and humanitarian crises. Can we really expect it to truly make a difference in the real world?
Tel Aviv has a reputation as a “non-stop city” but is also known for its local government’s use of smart technology to listen to and respond to residents’ needs and concerns. Alexandra Lande/Shutterstock

How does a city get to be ‘smart’? This is how Tel Aviv did it

To be a smart city is to know what your people want and need. And smart city leaders make sure residents can tell them by using technology to maintain a constant two-way flow of information.
Health objectives are at last being integrated into all levels of planning in New South Wales, from cities and towns to local places and buildings. pisaphotography/Shutterstock

With health assuming its rightful place in planning, here are 3 key lessons from NSW

The connections between city planning and health are many and varied, but getting health objectives integrated into all aspects of planning in New South Wales has been a long struggle.
To enhance the opportunities for children, we need to ensure we have vibrant and valued rural communities with a strong social and economic future. Shutterstock

How to solve Australia’s ‘rural school challenge’: focus on research and communities

A government review of regional, rural and remote education tells us we need to recognise the uniqueness of and understand successes in these communities to improve outcomes for these students.
There were interesting developments in the tit-for-tat tariff announcements between the US and China this week. Roman Pilipey/EPA/AAP

Vital Signs: the world economy can benefit from a vindicated Trump

Chinese President Xi Jinping spoke of plans to further open up the Chinese economy this week - and the world economy should hope US president Trump feels vindicated by this.
While some things glow all the time, glow-in-the-dark paint must be ‘told to glow’ - just like a phone needs to be charged or it won’t work. Mai Lam/The Conversation NY-BD-CC

Curious Kids: How does glow in the dark paint work?

You can see glow-in-the dark paint, but if you touch it, it is just as cold as the bedroom wall. So the glowing of the paint is different to the glowing of a light bulb.
Bill Shorten announced this week that a Labor government would triple penalties for dumping cheap overseas products in the Australian market. Tony McDonough/AAP

Shorten’s plan to triple anti-dumping penalties misunderstands the law

Bill Shorten has proposed tripling penalties for dumping cheap overseas products like steel into the Australian market. But this proposal suggests a failure to understand dumping and its regulation.

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