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USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences

USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences is the heart of the University of Southern California. The largest, oldest and most diverse of USC’s 19 schools, USC Dornsife is composed of more than 30 departments and dozens of research centers and institutes. USC Dornsife is home to approximately 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students and more than 750 faculty members with expertise across a spectrum of academic fields.

Our frontline scholars are working to find solutions to society’s toughest challenges by advancing human health, preserving and improving our environment, and strengthening our communities. Together, we are defining scholarship of consequence for the 21st century.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 163 articles

Giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) is a potential energy crop. Linking Tourism & Conservation/Flickr

Move over, corn and soybeans: The next biofuel source could be giant sea kelp

Making biofuels from crops grown on land poses trade-offs between food and fuel. A new study looks offshore.
Lisa Nhan puts on a musical performance with crystal bowls in Los Angeles on Feb. 20 as part of an event to call attention to anti-Asian violence and racist attitudes. AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes

Asian Americans top target for threats and harassment during pandemic

Since the beginning of the pandemic, hate crimes targeting Asian Americans have gotten increased media and public attention. New data shows these events are in fact happening more often.
Medieval Christians believed that heaven was a realm filled with dancing. Italian painter Fra Angelico’s ‘Last Judgment’ showing dancing angels. Fra Angelico's Last Judgment/Wikimedia

Why Christianity put away its dancing shoes – only to find them again centuries later

Despite opposition from the early church, dance was an integral part of Christian devotion for many centuries before falling out of favor.
A demonstrator dressed as Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman with blood on his hands protests outside the Saudi Embassy in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 8, 2018. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Why repressive Saudi Arabia remains a US ally

Saudi's crown prince approved the killing and dismemberment of a Washington Post columnist in 2018, the Biden administration says. So how can the US still see the Saudis as good partners?
Laws and policy are being made in Washington – both inside Congress and out. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Debunking the myth of legislative gridlock

The idea that Washington, DC is paralyzed by gridlock rests on half-truths about the legislative process and a basic misunderstanding of how contemporary policymaking works.
Relik Santo Valentinus dari Terni di basilika Saint Mary di Cosmedin. Dnalor 01 (Own work)

Santo Valentinus yang ‘asli’ bukanlah pelindung cinta

Hari Valentine berawal dari perjamuan untuk merayakan pemenggalan satu, atau mungkin dua martir Kristen pada Abad Ke-3. Butuh perjalanan panjang sebelum menjadi hari perayaan yang romantis.
Frequent social media use does not necessarily equate to addiction. Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images

No, you are not addicted to your digital device, but you may have a habit you want to break

People often worry about whether they may be addicted to digital devices, but addiction to a substance is far different from the habitual behavior that typically underlies digital usage.
The Senate wing of the U.S. Capitol building. Matt H. Wade via Wikimedia Commons

What happens when senators die or are incapacitated?

With several senators testing positive for the coronavirus, and many older than 65, political scientists look at 1954, when senators' deaths changed control of the chamber.

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