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York University, Canada

York University champions new ways of thinking that drive teaching and research excellence. Our students receive the education they need to make an impact on the world. Meaningful and unexpected careers result from cross-disciplinary programming, innovative course design and diverse experiential learning opportunities. York students and graduates push limits, achieve goals and find solutions to the world’s most pressing social challenges, empowered by a strong community. York is an internationally recognized research university with 11 faculties and 25 research centres. Located in Toronto, York is the third largest university in Canada, with a strong community of 53,000 students, 7,000 faculty and administrative staff, and more than 300,000 alumni. York U’s fully bilingual Glendon Campus is home to Southern Ontario’s Centre of Excellence for French Language and Bilingual Postsecondary Education.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 222 articles

New DNA analysis revealed that Calvin Hoover killed Christine Jessop in 1984. Toronto Police Chief James Ramer sits next to a screen displaying photos of Calvin Hoover during a news conference on Oct. 15, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Christine Jessop’s killer identified: Solved cold case raises questions about genetic privacy

Christine Jessop was murdered in 1984 and, 36 years later, DNA evidence finally identified her killer. But the police investigation's use of genetic genealogical databases raised questions about privacy.
Migrants, most of them wearing face masks to protect against the spread of COVID-19, gather outside the temporary refugee camp in Kara Tepe as they wait to depart from Lesbos for mainland Greece on Sept. 28, 2020. (AP Photo/Panagiotis Balaskas)

Dispatch from a refugee camp during the COVID-19 pandemic

In the middle of a windswept refugee camp in the aftermath of the burning of Moria, the COVID-19 pandemic is an afterthought.
Erosion damage caused by Hurricane Hanna is seen along the Fisher border wall, a privately funded border fence, along the Rio Grande River near Mission, Texas, on July 30, 2020. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

From COVID-19 to the climate emergency: Lessons from this global crisis for the next one

As a zoonotic virus, COVID-19 is itself a symptom of human-influenced climate change. It is also indicative of the humanitarian impact of future environmental crises.
A student adjusts his protective mask as he walks off the bus at the Bancroft Elementary School as students go back to school in Montréal, on Aug. 31, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Kids, masks & back-to-school FAQs: Are cloth masks best to protect against COVID-19? How often should masks be washed?

Back-to-school routines under COVID-19 look a little different than previous years. For one thing, kids need to wear masks. Which means many parents have mask questions.
Toronto Raptors’ Norman Powell goes up for a shot with Boston Celtics’ Kemba Walker in tow during an NBA conference semifinal playoff game, Sept. 11, 2020, in Lake Buena Vista, Fla. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

4 lessons from the NBA bubble for the future of live arts performance

The successes of the NBA's #WholeNewGame provide important lessons for performing artists about audience investment and hybrid digital-live events.
Signs direct the flow of student traffic at Kensington Community School amid the COVID-19 pandemic on Sept. 1, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Carlos Osorio

‘Pandemic pods’ may undermine promises of public education

The turn to private funding of education reduces the responsibility of governments to adequately fund schools and to ensure all children have access to high-quality education programming.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau looks on as Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland responds to a question during a news conference on Parliament Hill in August 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

The throne speech must blaze a bold new path — including imposing a wealth tax

The speech from the throne is just around the corner. Will the Liberal government make broad and much-needed economic and social change amid the pandemic, or will it give in to the wealthy again?
Mourners stand by the casket bearing Brandon Hendricks-Ellison at his funeral service July 15. The 17-year-old basketball star was one of the latest victims of the gun violence across New York City. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Gun violence has fuelled enduring trust issues for many Americans

A new analysis shows that the many Americans who have experienced being threatened by a gun or suffering a gunshot wound are significantly less likely to believe most people can be trusted.
Ontario Premier Doug Ford announces the government’s plan for reopening schools at Father Leo J. Austin Catholic Secondary School in Whitby, Ont., on July 30, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Empathetic incompetence? Ontario’s Doug Ford government at 2 years

Ontario Premier Doug Ford has presented an image of deep concern and empathy for the victims of COVID-19. But he's flailing when it comes to delivering proactive measures to fight the pandemic.
There is a growing racial consciousness in the wake of the resurgent Black Lives Matter movement. But corporate Canada is still overwhelmingly white. It’s time for a change. (Shutterstock)

Corporate diversity targets could help dismantle systemic racism

Just as women were unseen until recently, due to institutional sexism, as appropriate candidates for board positions, racialized Canadians are also dismissed due to institutional racism.
Comment letters in academic journals respond to previously published articles, and are subject to the same gender disparities found elsewhere in research. (Shutterstock)

Women less likely to critique men’s research in academic journals

Journal comments are responses to previously published articles. The gender disparity in the authorship of these comments both reflects and contributes to women's opportunities in scientific research.
A Syrian woman with her children, displaced by the Turkish military operation in northeastern Syria, speaks with a Kurdish worker at the Bardarash camp, north of Mosul, Iraq, in October 2019. (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)

Children’s books share refugees’ experiences and offer hope for the future

The COVID-19 pandemic provides parents with an opportunity to consider selecting books that address issues confronting children globally.
The wreckage of a ship at the devastated site of the explosion in the port of Beirut, Lebanon, on Aug.6, 2020. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus, Pool)

Beirut’s devastating port explosion echoes the 1917 Halifax Harbour blast

In 1917, two ships collided in the port of Halifax, resulting in an explosion similar to the Aug. 4 blast in Beirut. Port explosions have devastating effects far beyond the site of the actual blast.
The family of D’Andre Campbell, a Black man in a mental health crisis who was shot and killed by Peel police in April in his home in Brampton, is pictured outside their lawyer’s office in Toronto. Left to right: Sister Michelle Campbell, mother Yvonne Campbell and brother Dajour Campbell. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Carlos Osorio

Police encounters reveal a mental health system in distress

Federal incentives would enhance community support for those with mental illness and would avert police engagement.
In this August 2017 photo, Royal Canadian Mounted Police officers greet migrants as they enter into Canada at an unofficial border crossing at the end of Roxham Road in Champlain, N.Y., on the Québec border. A federal court has invalidated Canada’s Safe Third Country Agreement with the United States. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Canadian court correctly finds the U.S. is unsafe for refugees

The Canadian government should send a clear signal that it cares about constitutional and international law, heed a Federal Court ruling and take steps to immediately suspend the STCA.

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