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A miner is silhouetted as he passes through a doorway in a mine shaft 100 feet below the surface at the Giant Mine near Yellowknife, N.W.T. in July, 2003. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Diamond mines are not a girl’s best friend — Podcast

In today’s episode, we hear from two women who talk about how diamond mines in the Northwest Territories have negatively impacted women and girls and perpetuated gender violence.
Almost 30 per cent of Black households and 50 per cent of Indigenous households experience food insecurity. Bart Heird/Unsplash

Making our food fairer: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 12

Our food systems are failing to feed all of us. In this episode of Don’t Call Me Resilient, we pick apart what is broken and ways to fix it with two women who battle food injustice.
Scientist Michelle Murphy says we should ‘value wastelands …and injured life.’ Here, collected plastic from the shoreline of Hamilton, Ontario is sorted by colour. Jasmin Sessler/Unsplash

Why pollution is as much about colonialism as chemicals — Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 11

In this episode, two Indigenous scientists running collaborative labs to address our climate crisis offer some ideas for environmental justice, including a redefinition of pollution.
A CCTV camera sculpture in Toronto draws attention to the increasing surveillance in everyday life. Our guests discuss ways to resist this creeping culture. Lianhao Qu /Unsplash

Being Watched: How surveillance amplifies racist policing and threatens the right to protest — Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 10

Mass data collection and surveillance have become ubiquitous. For marginalized communities, the stakes of having their privacy violated are high.
A photo of art work by Banksy in London comments on the power imbalance of surveillance technology. Guests on this episode discuss how AI and Facial recognition have been flagged by civil rights leaders due to its inherent racial bias. Niv Singer/Unsplash

Being Watched: How surveillance amplifies racist policing and threatens the right to protest — Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 10 transcript

Once analysts gain access to our private data, they can use that information to influence and alter our behaviour and choices. If you’re marginalized in some way, the consequences are worse.
In this episode, we discuss some of the reasons South Asians are reporting higher rates of mental health issues than any other group. Here a group of young South Asians at Besharam, a Toronto nightclub hosted by DJ Amita (pre-pandemic). courtesy Besharam

Model minority blues: The mental health consequences of being a model citizen — Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 9

The pressure of needing to be a model minority — successful, quiet, hardworking — can force people to internalize their mental anguish and ends up leaving gaps in our mental health services.
Queen’s University professor Celeste Pedri-Spade says a basic first question to determine identity is: ‘Who is your grandmother?“ Here a group of Métis children and two women sitting on a large rock, Fort Chipewyan, Alberta, 1931. H. S. Spence, Canada. Department of Mines and Technical Surveys. Library and Archives Canada, PA-014406 /

Stolen identities: What does it mean to be Indigenous? Don’t Call Me Resilient Podcast EP 8 Transcript

Transcript for Don’t Call Me Resilient Podcast EP 8: Stolen identities: What does it mean to be Indigenous?
Being Indigenous is more than just genealogy. Here Lorralene Whiteye from the Ojibway Nation checks her hair in a mirror before the start of a healing ceremony, held by Toronto Indigenous Harm Reduction, to commemorate the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation in Toronto. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Evan Buhler

Stolen identities: What does it mean to be Indigenous? Don’t Call Me Resilient Podcast EP 8

In recent years, some prominent people have been called out for falsely claiming Indigenous identity. Why would someone falsely claim an identity? And what does it mean to be Indigenous?
Comic books like Elfquest were an inspiration to Canadian Indigenous author Daniel Heath Justice, who writes about ‘wonderworks.’ Warp Graphics/Elfquest

How stories about alternate worlds can help us imagine a better future: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 7 transcript

This is the full transcript for Don’t Call Me Resilient, episode 7: How stories about alternate worlds can help us imagine a better future.
In our second season, as we live through what feels like the world falling apart, we’re focusing on imagining a better future together. Teemu Paananen/Unsplash

Listen to our podcast: Don’t Call Me Resilient – Season 2

We’re launching the second season of Don’t Call Me Resilient, our podcast that takes on systemic racism and the ways it permeates our everyday lives.
In this episode, Roberta Timothy explains why racial justice is a public health issue and talks about why she believes historical scientific racism needs to be addressed. Dr. David Tom Cooke, of UC Davis Health, participated in Pfizer’s clinical trial as part of an effort to reduce skepticism about the COVID-19 vaccine. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

Black health matters: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 5 transcript

Transcript of Don’t Call Me Resilient, Episode 5: Black health matters
A woman takes part in a protest in Montreal, Jan. 30, 2021, to demand status for all workers and to demand dignity for all non status migrants as full human beings as the COVID-19 pandemic continues in Canada and around the world. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

How we treat migrant workers who put food on our tables: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 4 transcript

How we treat migrant workers who put food on our tables: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 4 transcript
A man meditates on the road by a police line as demonstrators protest on the section of 16th Street renamed Black Lives Matter Plaza, June 23, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

How to deal with the pain of racism — and become a better advocate: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 2 transcript

This is the full transcript for Don’t Call Me Resilient, EP 2: How to deal with the pain of racism — and become a better advocate.
This illustration of Little Eva and Uncle Tom by Hammatt Billings appears in the first edition of ‘Uncle Tom’s Cabin.’ (Uncle Tom's Cabin & American Culture: A Multi-Media Archive)

What’s in a word? How to confront 150 years of racial stereotypes: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 1 transcript

This is the full transcript for Don’t Call Me Resilient, episode 1: What’s in a word? How to confront 150 years of racial stereotypes and language.

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