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Articles on Indigenous

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A sign on Charlotte St., in Sackville, N.B. Women rarely come from places named after women, and the exceptions usually commemorate them differently than men. (Peter Barr)

Women are vastly underrepresented in Canada’s place names

Far more streets, buildings and public spaces in Canada are named after men than women, despite women making up a majority of the population.
Duncan McCue, left, walks with Rocky James, a podcast guest on CBC’s ‘Kuper Island.’ (Evan Aagaard/CBC Podcasts)

How to decolonize journalism — Podcast

Canadian journalist institutions have failed to address their ongoing colonialism and that has meant that urgent Indigenous issues have been ignored or sensationalized.
University research has a legacy of doing harm to Indigenous communities. However, a new collaborative project is showing how research can be done in a better and inclusive way. (Shutterstock)

Collaborative Indigenous Research is a way to repair the legacy of harmful research practices

Harmful research practices have done serious damage to Indigenous communities and created distrust. The Collaborative Indigenous Research Digital Garden is one way to repair that damage.
Neighbours from Tla’amin, K’omoks, Qualicum and Tsimshian Nations gather around the newly. erected plaque on Xwe’etay honoring the ancestral Indigenous people of the island. (Kathy Schulz)

How community-engaged archaeology can be a pathway to reconciliation

One project on a small island in B.C. is demonstrating how archaeology can bring communities together and serve as a basis for reconciliation.
Co-author of this article, Chief Ninawa, hereditary Chief of the Huni Kui Indigenous people of the Amazon, holds a sign that says: ‘Amazon is life, petroleum and gas is death’ outside a hotel in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)

Views from COP27: How the climate conference could confront colonialism by centring Indigenous rights

A different future will not be possible without reverence, respect, reciprocity and responsibility towards the Earth. On this issue, Indigenous Peoples have a lot to share.
Participants in the Indigenous Peoples Of the Americas Parade in New York City, Oct. 15, 2022. Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images

What makes someone Indigenous?

Geographic, cultural and political identity are all part of being Indigenous.
Establishing Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas, like the Thaidene Nëné National Park Reserve in the Northwest Territories, while respecting original treaties can help Canada meet its international conservation commitments. (Iris Catholique)

An attack of Indigenous rights is an attack on nature conservation

To address the climate and biodiversity crises, we must stop criminalizing Indigenous Peoples for exercising their treaty rights and start upholding them instead.
People perform during the Boi-Bumbá in Parintins. The city’s annual festival has shown how remote communities can thrive despite isolation.

Parintins: A remote Brazilian city overcoming isolation through a festival

The “Festival do Boi-Bumbá” changed the fate of Parintins, Brazil. Its success shows the crucial role that cultural festivals play in isolated territories that often lack material infrastructure.
In the face of governmental efforts to dismantle Indigenous agricultural economies, Indigenous communities have made important strides toward food sovereignty. (Shutterstock)

Indigenous food sovereignty requires better and more accurate data collection

A lack of data prevents governments and agri-food organizations from knowing what kinds of supports should be provided to reinvigorate Indigenous agricultural economies.
Maria Elena Paredes, coordinator of the Community Vigilance Committee for the Ashéninka community of Sawawo Hito 40, points to satellite images showing deforestation. Reynaldo Vela/USAID

Indigenous defenders stand between illegal roads and survival of the Amazon rainforest – Brazil’s election could be a turning point

Illegal roads have brought deforestation, fire and other environmental damage to the Amazon. The results of the 2022 presidential runoff could have a major impact for the future.
Alex Bird (second from the left) and his siblings from the Lheidli T'enneh First Nation were among the first students to attend this public school, near Prince George, B.C., in the early 1910s. (Royal B.C. Museum, Image B-00342, British Columbia Archives)

Reckoning with the history of public schooling and settler colonialism

In B.C., residential school principals sat on public school boards, and some Indigenous children even attended public schools. Understanding such links matters for truth and reconciliation.
After the death of Queen Elizabeth, questions arise about whose life gets mourned and who does not. Here is the Queen with the Guards of Honour in Nigeria, Dec. 3, 2003, for the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

About the Queen and the Crown’s crimes (or how to talk about the unmourned) — Podcast

In the middle of the tremendous outpouring of love and grief for the Queen and the monarchy she represented, not everyone wants to take a moment of silence. And there are a lot of reasons why.

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