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Articles on Marine ecosystems

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Warmer-water preferring fish species like sardines and squid may soon dominate seafood menus on the west coast of Canada. (Shutterstock)

Climate change is now on the menu at seafood restaurants

As the ocean temperature rises, many marine species are moving toward the north and south poles in search of cooler waters, thus rewriting the menus of seafood restaurants on the West Coast of Canada.
Marine ecosystems across Canada’s coasts, such as eelgrass meadows that provide an important habitat for juvenile species, are threatened by human activities and climate change. (Nicolas Winkler)

Canada’s marine conservation toolbox needs an overhaul to counter climate change

It is time to acknowledge and address the rapid shifts in Canada’s oceans. To meet this challenge, Canada’s marine conservation toolbox — starting with the Oceans Act — needs an overhaul.
South Africa has an impressive record of marine biological research in protected areas, but the country needs to pay greater attention to the human aspects. Doug Lang

Protected marine areas should serve nature and people: a review of South Africa’s efforts

The social, ecological and governance objectives of marine protected areas need to be understood to enhance benefits to both people and the environment.
Blue sharks, which are prized for their fins, swimming off Cape Point in South Africa. Morne Hardenberg

South Africa’s plan to protect sharks needs an urgent update

Sharks grow slowly and produce few young compared to bony fishes. In many cases, this means that their populations are fished out faster than can be replenished if not well managed.
Tampa Bay’s sea grass meadows need sunlight to thrive. Algae blooms block that light and can be toxic to marine life. Joe Whalen Caulerpa/Tampa Bay Estuary Program via Unsplash

Water being pumped into Tampa Bay could cause a massive algae bloom, putting fragile manatee and fish habitats at risk

Harmful algae blooms are an increasing problem in Florida. Once nutrients are in the water to fuel them, little can be done to stop the growth, and the results can be devastating for marine life.

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