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Articles on Scientific publishing

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A portrait of Albert Einstein on a transformer station in St.Petersburg, Russia. (Shutterstock)

Why the h-index is a bogus measure of academic impact

The h-index has become an indicator of quality for many researchers and may influence the allocation of research funds. But some question its value.
For now, it’s going to be trickier for the University of California community to access some academic journals. Michelle/Flickr

University of California’s showdown with the biggest academic publisher aims to change scholarly publishing for good

The UC libraries let their Elsevier journal subscriptions lapse and now the publisher has cut their online access. It's a painful milestone in the fight UC hopes may transform how journals get paid.
Libraries subscribe digitally to academic journals – and are left with nothing in the stacks when the contract expires. Eric Chan/Flickr

University of California’s break with the biggest academic publisher could shake up scholarly publishing for good

Digital publishing hasn't resulted in the free and open access to information many envisioned. Universities are increasingly fed up with a system they see as charging them for their own scholars' labor.
It may take time for a tiny step forward to show its worth. ellissharp/Shutterstock.com

Novelty in science – real necessity or distracting obsession?

Scientists are rewarded with funding and publications when they come up with innovative findings. But in the midst of a 'reproducibility crisis,' being new isn't the only thing to value about research.
Locking articles away behind a paywall stifles access. Elizabeth

Academic journal publishing is headed for a day of reckoning

In our institutions of higher education and our research labs, scholars first produce, then buy back, their own content. With the costs rising and access restricted, something's got to give.
Opening up data and materials helps with research transparency. REDPIXEL.PL via Shutterstock.com

Research transparency: 5 questions about open science answered

Partly in response to the so-called 'reproducibility crisis' in science, researchers are embracing a set of practices that aim to make the whole endeavor more transparent, more reliable – and better.
More is less in the world of research publications. Desktop image via www.shutterstock.com.

Peer review is in crisis, but should be fixed, not abolished

The traditional mode of publishing scientific research faces much criticism – primarily for being too slow and sometimes shoddily done. Maybe fewer publications of higher quality is the way forward.
Experiment design affects the quality of the results. IAEA Seibersdorf Historical Images

Why isn’t science better? Look at career incentives

Embracing more rigorous scientific methods would mean getting science right more often than we currently do. But the way we value and reward scientists makes this a challenge.
Scientists themselves may be the key to finding the right balance. Scales image via www.shutterstock.com.

Accurate science or accessible science in the media – why not both?

The public loses when their only choices are inaccessible, impenetrable journal articles or overhyped click-bait about science. Scientists themselves need to step up and help bridge the divide.

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