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Articles on Water

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When water and boiling oil mix, the result can be explosive, as seen in this demonstration. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Travis Alston/Released via Flickr

Why do frozen turkeys explode when deep-fried?

Deep-fried turkeys are delicious, but making one can be dangerous. The scientific reason for fiery Thanksgiving mishaps? A difference in the densities of ice, water and oil.
Sign at a boat ramp on Lake Mead, near Boulder City, Nevada, Aug. 13, 2021. The lake currently is roughly two-thirds empty. AP Photo/John Locher

As climate change parches the Southwest, here’s a better way to share water from the shrinking Colorado River

A Western scholar proposes allocating water from the Colorado River based on percentages of its actual flow instead of fixed amounts that exceed what’s there – and including tribes this time.
Sandstorm approaching Merzouga Settlement in Erg Chebbi Desert, Morocco. Pavliha/Getty Images

Six areas where action must focus to rescue this planet

Humanity’s biggest challenges are not technical, but social, economic, political and behavioural. Effective actions are still possible to stabilise the climate and the planet, but must be taken now.
Some of North America’s groundwater is so old, it fell as rain before humans arrived here thousands of years ago. Maria Fuchs via Getty Images

Ancient groundwater: Why the water you’re drinking may be thousands of years old

As surface water diminishes in the Western US, people are drilling deeper wells – and tapping into older groundwater that can take thousands of years to replenish naturally.
In an photo from 2016, Potlotek First Nation resident Patricia Paul holds a sample of water she says came from her taps at home. In December 2019 the community got a new water treatment system. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Steve Wadden

Federal election: If all parties agree that we need to end drinking water advisories in Indigenous communities, why haven’t we?

It seems all party leaders can agree, water advisories in First Nation communities need to end. If there is agreement, then isn’t it time to stop making it a campaign promise and make change?
In high alpine terrain, sun and dry air can turn snow straight into water vapor. Jeffrey Pang/WikimediaCommons

Snow can disappear straight into the atmosphere in hot, dry weather

As rivers run dry in the Rocky Mountains and the West, it’s easy to wonder where all the snow you see on mountain peaks goes. Some of it ends up in the air, but researchers aren’t sure how much.

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