Professor of International Economics Professor of Economics and Public Policy, University of Michigan

Professor Deardorff is primarily interested in the economics of international trade, both theory and policy. He has contributed to the pure theory of international trade, adapting and extending traditional neoclassical models of international trade and specialization. On trade policy, Deardorff has written widely on the uses of trade policies and the rules restricting these uses. Also, with Professor Robert Stern of University of Michigan and Professor Drusilla Brown of Tufts University, he has contributed to the development and use of computable general equilibrium models of international trade policy. His recent and current topics of theoretical research include the role of trade costs in determining patterns of trade, the determinants of international specialization, and the mechanisms by which trade liberalization may stimulate industrialization and growth. On trade policy, Deardorff has worked with his colleagues on the prospective effects of the current Doha Round of trade liberalization, as well as writing on the measurement of barriers to trade in goods and services. More broadly, he and his colleagues participate in the ongoing debate on the pros and cons of globalization.

Experience

  • –present
    Professor of International Economics Professor of Economics and Public Policy, University of Michigan