Senior Research Impact Coordinator, University of Cambridge

I am Senior REF Research Impact Coordinator at the University of Cambridge, working across the arts, humanities and social sciences.

My academic interests include music and human rights, cultural memory, oral history, music and society, music and migration, popular music history, music’s relationships to literature, public policy, and digital humanities, with a focus on Latin America.

I am currently writing a book commissioned by Oxford University Press, based on my long-standing research on music in centres for political detention and torture in Pinochet’s Chile.

My research has been featured by The British Museum as part of the "I Object: Ian Hislop's Search for Dissent exhibition" (2018-19). My work has been cited by over 130 media outlets in twelve languages, and has led to the foundation of the UK NGO Music in Detention.

I direct and edit the bilingual digital platform Cantos Cautivos / Captive Songs, which compiles testimonies on musical experiences under political detention in Chile. Hailed as “extraordinary” by The New Yorker critic Alex Ross, I first developed this project as part of a Leverhulme Early Career Fellowship at Manchester, in partnership with the Museum of Memory and Human Rights (Santiago, Chile) and networks of ex-prisoners.

My first book, Alejo Carpentier and the Musical Text (MHRA / Routledge, 2015), bridges intermediality and intertextuality through examinations of Carpentier’s literary use of music as formative, as form and as performed. My book has been reviewed by the Bulletin of Latin American Research, Latin American Music Review and Fundación Carpentier.

My teaching areas have included Latin American popular music, music and human rights, music and social movements, intermediality, fieldwork, and research ethics. In 2016, I was shortlisted for the University of Manchester-wide Teaching Awards for Most Accessible Lecturer.

I am in demand as a speaker, on and outside the academic circuit. In 2013, I spoke at the Council of Europe about my research on music and political detention in Chile.

Outside academia, I have worked as a freelance journalist (for BBC, The Guardian and The Economist, among other outlets), as Commissioning Officer in the governmental sector (conducting applied research to inform new policies and commissions, designing and implementing research ethics processes and cultural strategies), and as a musician (I started my career as a full-time violinist of the Santiago Philharmonic Orchestra, Chile).

I hold degrees from the Catholic University of Chile, the Royal Academy of Music, the University of London and The Open University, and I am a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

Experience

  • 2020–present
    Senior Research Impact Coordinator, University of Cambridge