Suzanne Snodgrass

Associate Professor, Physiotherapy, University of Newcastle

BIOGRAPHY

Suzanne Snodgrass is an Associate Professor in Physiotherapy. She holds a Bachelors in Physical Therapy (University of North Carolina), a research Masters and a PhD (University of Newcastle). Since completing her PhD in 2008, she has established the Spinal Movement Laboratory at Newcastle that now includes 4 PhD, 2 Masters and 5 Honours students, and a strong track record in musculoskeletal pain research (>40 journal publications and >45 conference presentations).

Associate Professor Snodgrass has a passion for understanding the mechanisms that define and modulate musculoskeletal pain in order to find new solutions for patients. Working as a clinician in musculoskeletal pain and sports settings for 10 years prior to academia motivates her to seek practical solutions for pateints that translate to the clinic. The major focus of her research is on investigating treatments for chronic musculoskeletal pain that improve movement dysfunction and induce neuroplasticity. Topics include the investigation of neural and kinematic biomarkers in chronic pain, task-specific training for improving symptoms of chronic pain, defining the dose of conservative therapies for pain, and estimating injury risk in work and sporting settings.

PUBLICATIONS: Dr Snodgrass’ work has been published in highly rated international journals such as Manual Therapy, Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology, Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, and Physical Therapy. An early career researcher 5 years post-PhD (with career interruption), Dr Snodgrass has > 200 citations and an H-index of 10. She has published an average of 6 papers per year since her PhD was awarded, averaging 7 citations per paper. In the last 5 years, her H-index has more than tripled (from 3 to 10, with 54% of papers as first author; career 63% first author), evidence of her upward trajectory in research and recognition in the field of physiotherapy and neck pain.

Experience

  • 2004–2016
    Associate Professor, The University of Newcastle