Olympic authorities were quick to deny that the green pool posed a risk to divers’ health, but that actually depends on why the water changed colour. Reuters/Antonio Bronic

Going for … green? Why Rio’s swimming pools are changing colour

The possible culprits are: a sudden algae bloom; a change in pool alkalinity; or a chemical reaction in the water. How do these cause a change in the colour of the water?
Athletes must execute their individualised race plan to the best of their ability to win. Reuters/Michael Dalder

Explainer: what makes a winning swimmer?

Races at the international level are often decided by as little as 0.01 of a second.

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