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Articles on Aging

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Flowers sit on a bench in front of a for-profit long-term care home in Pickering, Ont., where dozen of seniors died of COVID-19, in April 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Ontario election gives voters the chance to choose people over profits in long-term care

Ontario voters can bring about change by prioritizing people over profits and casting our ballots for those committed to transforming long-term care into a non-profit model focused on care.
Frailty is a state of reduced physical function for seniors living independently in the community. It can affect endurance, balance, cognition or social engagement. (Shutterstock)

Faster diagnosis of frailty in seniors aging at home is key to helping them stay independent

Frailty — the physical limitations of seniors living in the community — needs to be assessed before it can be addressed with social and health support. Virtual assessments can speed up this process.
Telling elders scary stories about online scammers is not the best way to keep them safe. Olga Gavrilenko/EyeEm via Getty Images

Older Americans are given the wrong idea about online safety – here’s how to help them help themselves

Older Americans are often taught to be fearful of hackers and scammers in their midst while also being told to investigate potential threats. Better advice is to not engage.
Physical therapy – which can include small jumps, stretches, massage, heat therapy and even water exercises – can help manage arthritis in dogs. Manu Vega/Monument via Getty Images

For dogs with arthritis, daily activities don’t have to be painful

Since canine arthritis can’t be cured, the goal of treatment in dogs is to reduce inflammation to increase comfort and improve a dog’s quality of life.
A new brain-imaging study finds that participants who had even mild COVID-19 showed an average reduction in whole brain sizes. Kirstypargeter/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Even mild cases of COVID-19 can leave a mark on the brain, such as reductions in gray matter – a neuroscientist explains emerging research

New research offers insights into the brain after COVID-19 that may have implications for our understanding of long COVID-19 and how the disease affects our senses of taste and smell.
Older adults are increasingly using technologies in their everyday lives, but the needs of this population are often ignored in AI design. (Shutterstock)

Artificial intelligence can discriminate on the basis of race and gender, and also age

Algorithms have been shown to discriminate on the basis of race and gender. Studying age-related discrimination is essential to develop more equitable AI systems and technologies.
You can start these conversations simply, like saying, “I need to think about the future. Can you help me?” Richard Ross/The Image Bank via Getty Images

End-of-life conversations can be hard, but your loved ones will thank you

When you prepare to talk about end-of-life decisions and the legacy you want to leave behind, try thinking about them as gifts you bestow to family and friends.
Older adults can experience negative health effects due to social isolation. (Shutterstock)

Online arts programming improves quality of life for isolated seniors

Social isolation in older adults can contribute to negative health outcomes. The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated this, but an arts-based program can alleviate some of the loneliness.
The new findings, although preliminary, are raising concerns about the potential long-term effects of COVID-19. Yuichiro Chino via Getty Images

Preliminary research finds that even mild cases of COVID-19 leave a mark on the brain – but it’s not yet clear how long it lasts

Reduced brain volume in people who have experienced COVID-19 resembles brain changes typically seen in older adults. The implications of these findings are not yet clear.
Biologists and demographers are actively debating whether there is a natural cap on the human life span, and how high that might be. eucyln/iStock via Getty Images Plus

The maximum human life span will likely increase this century, but not by more than a decade

Jeanne Calment of France died in 1997 at the age of 122 years and 164 days. That record will be broken this century, statistical models suggest.

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