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Articles on Chile protests

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Chileans celebrate victory after the referendum, in Santiago, Chile, Oct. 25, 2020. Felipe Vargas Figueroa/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Chile abolishes its dictatorship-era constitution in groundbreaking vote for a more inclusive democracy

After a year of unrest Chileans voted decisively on Oct. 25 to replace their constitution, a relic of the military dictator Pinochet. Civilians, half of them women, will write the new constitution.
‘Chile Decides’ whether to change its military dictatorship-era constitution at a popular referendum on Oct. 25. Martin Bernetti/AFP via Getty Images

Chile puts its constitution on the ballot after year of civil unrest

On Oct. 25 Chile will decide whether to replace its dictatorship-era constitution with a new one written wholly by the Chilean people. The vote shows how protests can change the course of a nation.
Protesters cross the Brooklyn Bridge on June 19, 2020 – Juneteenth – in the United States’ third straight week of protest. Pablo Monsalve / VIEWpress via Getty Images

George Floyd protests aren’t just anti-racist – they are anti-authoritarian

Unrest in the US looks familiar to Latin Americans, who are accustomed to resisting undemocratic governments – and to their protest movements being met with violent suppression.
Women in Delhi’s Shaheen Bagh neighborhood are protesting a new Indian citizenship law that they say will discriminate against Muslims, women – and, particularly, Muslim women. Burhaan Kinu/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

Indian women protest new citizenship laws, joining a global ‘fourth wave’ feminist movement

A round-the-clock strike of Muslim women in a working-class neighborhood of Delhi is India's most enduring pocket of resistance to religious discrimination, inequality and gender violence.
Chilean President Sebastián Piñera decrees a state of emergency to restore public order after a day of violent protest, Oct.19, 2019. Sebastián Rodríguez/Prensa Presidencia

Chile protests: President’s speeches early in crisis missed the mark, AI study reveals

As protests raged across Chile last month, President Piñera repeatedly addressed the nation. Researchers fed his speeches into an AI system to assess the emotions behind his words.
Chilean police clash with anti-government demonstrators during a protest in Santiago, Chile, Nov. 12, 2019. Santiago is one of a dozen cities worldwide to see mass unrest in recent months. AP Photo/Esteban Felix

Urban unrest propels global wave of protests

From Santiago and La Paz to Beirut and Jakarta, many of the cities now gripped by protest share a common problem: They've grown too much, too fast.
Demonstrators clash with a police water cannon during a recent anti-government protest in Santiago, Chile. Several South American countries have been experiencing massive social unrest in recent months. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)

What’s going on in South America? Understanding the wave of protests

In the last century, several South American countries faced coups, military dictatorships and social uprisings. Despite economic improvements in recent years, the continent remains mired in unrest.

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