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Articles on Ice Age

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Artist’s impression of an eastern moa in its podocarp forest habitat. Paul Martinson. Te Papa Tongarewa/Museum of NZ

How did ancient moa survive the ice age – and what can they teach us about modern climate change?

DNA from ancient eastern moa bones is unlocking the secrets of their survival during the last ice age, and providing lessons for today’s threatened species.
Wolverine numbers are declining globally due to heavy trapping and predator killing by humans, habitat loss, climate change and various other factors. (Shutterstock)

Connecting fragmented wolverine habitat is essential for their conservation

The key to protecting wolverines around the world is to reduce trapping, minimize predator control pressures, and to protect and connect large blocks of intact habitat they need to survive.
The planet and the way we live on it are constantly changing. Buena Vista Images via Getty Images

What will the Earth be like in 500 years?

The Earth is constantly changing in natural ways, but most of those changes are very slow. Humans are speeding up other changes with global warming.
The Perito Moreno glacier in Patagonia. The sheer number of seracs gives the impression that the glacier’s surface is covered in dragon scales. Olivier Dangles/IRD

In praise of glaciers, those dragons of ice viewed with concern and fascination

The parable of the dragons underlines the need to apprehend glacier disappearance in a transdisciplinary way, to create a dialogue between the physical, ecological and philosophical sciences.
A glacial depositional feature – an erratic – is a large rock that has been ‘bull-dozed’ and deposited by a moving glacier. Elizabeth Rudolph

Marion Island’s last ice age happened earlier than we thought. Why it matters

These findings are in stark contrast with the original worldview that suggested the entire globe was at a maximum glaciated state around 20 000 years ago.
Surface detail of the Tomanowos meteorite, showing cavities produced by dissolution of iron. Eden, Janine and Jim/Wikipedia

Tomanowos, the meteorite that survived mega-floods and human folly

Tomanowos, aka the Willamette Meteorite, may be the world’s most interesting rock. Its story includes catastrophic ice age floods, theft of Native American cultural heritage and plenty of human folly.
This hunting scene, painted 44,000 years ago, is the oldest known work of representational art in the world. Ratno Sardi

Indonesian cave paintings show the dawn of imaginative art and human spiritual belief

A recent cave art discovery in remote Indonesia is changing our understanding of the beginnings of art and the emergence of religious-like thinking in the early human story.

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