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Articles on Jimmy Carter

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It’s a top government job, but what does being vice president mean? AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

What does the vice president do?

The vice president may be second in line for the most powerful job in the nation, but there isn't necessarily a lot to do besides wait – unless the president wants another adviser.
Biden’s is entrusting Secretary of State nominee Antony Blinken to set U.S. foreign policy on a different course. Mark Makela/Getty Images

Biden’s chance to revive US tradition of inserting ethics in foreign policy

Four years of 'America First' has seen the US retreat from the world. But as a scholar of international relations explains, Biden could return Washington to the role of a more moral global leader.
President Donald Trump speaks during a Hanukkah reception at the White House in 2019. AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta

How Hanukkah came to be an annual White House celebration

For much of American history, the only December holiday to be recognized in the White House was Christmas, but menorah lightings are now an annual tradition.
Will Donald Trump win again? History suggests it’s possible. The president pumps his fist after speaking at a campaign rally at Phoenix Goodyear Airport on Oct. 28, 2020, in Goodyear, Ariz. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Why voter loyalty to incumbents could spell victory for Trump

Americans at the ballot box have historically adopted the adage: Better the devil you know than the devil you don't. Does that mean Trump will win a second term?
Supporters on election night 2016 at a Hillary Clinton party, when it became clear poll-based forecasts had been off target. Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Why Americans are so enamored with election polls

Polling is an imperfect attempt at providing insight and explanation. But the public's desire for insight and explanation about elections never ends, so polls endure despite their flaws and failures.
Legendary New York City columnist Jimmy Breslin, right, ready to do shoe-leather journalistic research in a bar, said preelection polls were “monstrous frauds.” Michael Brennan/Getty Images

When noted journalists bashed political polls as nothing more than ‘a fragmentary snapshot’ of a moment in time

There was a time when well-known journalists resented preelection polls and didn’t mind saying so. One even said he felt “secret glee and relief when the polls go wrong.” Why did they feel this way?
Good old days: Before the coronavirus hit, governors, like California’s Gavin Newsom, had easier jobs. AP/Rich Pedroncelli, Pool

Plummeting tax revenues will put governors in tough budget situations

As Congress considers further financial help for victims of the coronavirus pandemic, the magnitude of the fiscal crisis that governors and their states will have to face is just starting to emerge.
On Jan. 3, 2012, voters sign in on caucus night at Point of Grace Church in Waukee, Iowa. AP/Evan Vucci

Why the race for the presidency begins with the Iowa caucus

How did a small, rural state become so influential in the presidential nominating process? A political scientist traces the development of the first-in-the-nation Iowa caucus.
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren speaks at a campaign house party on July 27, 2019, in Bow, N.H. AP Photo/Elise Amendola

How did the presidential campaign get to be so long?

While other countries set strict limits on the length of campaigns, American presidential races have become drawn-out, yearslong affairs. It wasn’t always this way.
President George H.W. Bush in 1990. Mark Reinstein/www.shutterstock.com

George H.W. Bush laid the foundation for education reform

Though his education initiative staggered while he was in office, the late former President George H.W. Bush had an influence that continues to shape education policy, an education historian says.

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