Articles on Publishing

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The Conversation’s Deputy Health Editor, Phoebe Roth, and Assistant Editor: Technology, Noor Gillani, agree this is the must-have read of 2019. Wes Mountain/The Conversation

The Conversation Yearbook 2019: celebrate with us and grab your discounted copy

This collection has become an annual bestseller, navigating fake news and shouty views and offering a fresh perspective on the fundamental issues. Get your copy today.
Open access publishing enables free and easy dissemination of work, but this does not meant that it engages with literary culture. Titles are isolated from bookshops, reviews, and cultural conversations. Photo by Fred Kearney on Unsplash

The open access shift at UWA Publishing is an experiment doomed to fail

The notion that a respected publishing house can be replaced by open access publishing is disproved by examining other recent examples, such as the now-closed University of Adelaide Press.
Alexis Wright, pictured here in 2007 after winning the Miles Franklin award for her book Carpentaria, is one of many writers first published by University of Queensland Press. Dean Lewins/AAP

Reading the landscape: university publishing houses and the national creative estate

The University of Queensland Press has a peerless record of discovering, nurturing and supporting Australian writers. A new anthology is a cross-section of many of their writings.
Four of the six shortlisted books for the 2018 Stella Prize were from smaller presses, as was the winner, Alexis Wright’s Tracker. Stella Prize

Friday essay: the remarkable, prize-winning rise of our small publishers

As major publishers chase bestselling books, small ones are leading the way in publishing Australian literary fiction. And of late, they have been sweeping our major literary awards.
Locking articles away behind a paywall stifles access. Elizabeth

Academic journal publishing is headed for a day of reckoning

In our institutions of higher education and our research labs, scholars first produce, then buy back, their own content. With the costs rising and access restricted, something's got to give.

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