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Articles on South America

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A deforested piece of land in the Amazon rainforest near Porto Velho, in the state of Rondonia, in northern Brazil, on Aug. 23, 2019. Carl De SouzaA/FP via Getty Images

Brazil’s economic crisis, prolonged by COVID-19, poses an enormous challenge to the Amazon

Because Brazil's economic prosperity in the last two decades is increasingly linked to the Amazon's good health, restoring the country's economy is a critical first step toward ending deforestation.
Venezuelans wait at the Colombian border to be processed and housed in tents in 2020. All Venezuelans now in Colombia will receive a 10-year residency permit. Schneyder Mendoza/AFP via Getty Images

Colombia gives nearly 1 million Venezuelan migrants legal status and right to work

Though not a rich country, Colombia is unusually well equipped to handle mass migration because of its own history with political strife and displacement.
Victims of forced sterilizations protest in Lima, Peru, in 2014. Public hearings to uncover this dark chapter of the Fujimori dictatorship began in January. Erneseto Benavides/AFP via Getty Images

Forcibly sterilized during Fujimori dictatorship, thousands of Peruvian women demand justice

Forced sterilization of Indigenous women was a covert part of 'family planning' under Fujimori. Over 200,000 Peruvians underwent tubal ligations between 1996 and 2001 – many without their consent.
Stratford Hall in Westmoreland, Virginia, where enslaved cook and chocolatier Caesar lived and worked in the kitchen. Wikipedia

Oppression in the kitchen, delight in the dining room: The story of Caesar, an enslaved chef and chocolatier in Colonial Virginia

There's a bittersweet history to chocolate in America. At one plantation museum in Virginia, the story of enslaved chocolatier Caesar shows the oppression that lay behind the elite's culinary treat.
Art featuring the slain Rio politician Marielle Franco, whose 2018 murder remains unsolved. Carl de Souza/AFP via Getty Images

‘My vote will be Black’ – A wave of Afro-Brazilian women ran for office in 2020 but found glass ceiling hard to break

The 2018 murder of Rio city councilwoman Marielle Franco inspired record numbers of Black women to get involved in politics. Winning proved harder – but it isn't the only point of their campaigns.
The Perito Moreno glacier in Patagonia. The sheer number of seracs gives the impression that the glacier’s surface is covered in dragon scales. Olivier Dangles/IRD

In praise of glaciers, those dragons of ice viewed with concern and fascination

The parable of the dragons underlines the need to apprehend glacier disappearance in a transdisciplinary way, to create a dialogue between the physical, ecological and philosophical sciences.
Chileans celebrate victory after the referendum, in Santiago, Chile, Oct. 25, 2020. Felipe Vargas Figueroa/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Chile abolishes its dictatorship-era constitution in groundbreaking vote for a more inclusive democracy

After a year of unrest Chileans voted decisively on Oct. 25 to replace their constitution, a relic of the military dictator Pinochet. Civilians, half of them women, will write the new constitution.
‘Chile Decides’ whether to change its military dictatorship-era constitution at a popular referendum on Oct. 25. Martin Bernetti/AFP via Getty Images

Chile puts its constitution on the ballot after year of civil unrest

On Oct. 25 Chile will decide whether to replace its dictatorship-era constitution with a new one written wholly by the Chilean people. The vote shows how protests can change the course of a nation.
Argentine cartoonist Joaquin Salvador Lavado, who passed away on September 30, also known as “Quino” poses with his comic strip character Mafalda. Alejandro Pagni/AFP

From Mafalda with love: three lessons from the late Quino and his immortal creation

Through his work, the Argentinian cartoonist Joaquin Salvador Lavado Tejon, known to all as Quino, engaged in pointed social critique on a range of topics that are even more relevant today.
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo with Guyana’s president, Mohamed Irfaan Ali, Sept. 18. Pompeo is the first U.S. secretary of state to visit the tiny South American country. AFP via Getty Images

Pandemic crushes Guyana’s dreams of big oil profits as ‘resource curse’ looms over oil-producing nations

Tiny Guyana hoped to see unprecedented wealth this year as ExxonMobil's offshore wells began pumping out crude. Instead, it got a pandemic and political strife. Other oil states are struggling, too.

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