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Articles on Viktor Orbán

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Benjamin Netanyahu sits in the Knesset before parliament voted June 13, 2021, in Jerusalem to approve the new government that doesn’t include him, Amir Levy/Getty Images

It wasn’t just politics that led to Netanyahu’s ouster – it was fear of his demagoguery

Benjamin Netanyahu wasn't ousted just for typical political reasons, such as other politicians' ambitions or grievances. He was thrown out because he was seen as a threat to democracy.
Among the many issues that Joe Biden has to deal with, what place does he reserve for the alliance of democracies project that he mentioned during his presidential campaign? Chip Somodevilla/AFP

Europe must push Joe Biden’s ‘alliance of democracies’

The new US administration has talked about setting up an alliance of democracies. For the time being, the project seems vague. Yet such an alliance is necessary.
U.S. President Donald Trump waves to supporters as he departs after playing golf at the Trump National Golf Club in Sterling Va., on Nov. 8, 2020. Trump is refusing to concede the election, a common tactic of authoritarians. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Trump lost, but racism is alive and infused in U.S. history

Trump is reminiscent of strongmen like Hungary's Viktor Orbán and Turkey's Recep Tayyip Erdogan. A good portion of the electorate like what he's selling anyway. That's a bitter pill for the U.S.
In this August 2016 photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump, right, welcomes pro-Brexit British politician Nigel Farage to speak at a campaign rally in Jackson, Miss. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

After Trump and Brexit: The coming of the progressive wave

Most populists are only against the system, they aren’t for anything in particular, as Donald Trump’s presidency and Brexit proves. A progressive wave will soon be upon us in response.
State police officers during a “Reopen Virginia” rally around Capitol Square in Richmond on April 22, 2020. Getty/Ryan M. Kelly / AFP

Are we living in a dystopia?

'Dystopia' is a term that's gained popularity during the coronavirus pandemic. But it's not a synonym for 'a bad time,' and a government's poor handling of a crisis does not constitute dystopia.
The Mória refugee camp in Lesbos, Greece. Giulio Piscitelli

How Covid-19 breaks down solidarity with migrants

The health crisis is pushing governments to try to control the movement of people, but migrants continue to arrive in EU reception centres, which are currently experiencing a crisis of tragic proportions.
Hungarian police officers check cars at the closed Austria-Hungary border, March 18, 2020. Alex Halada/AFP via Getty Images

Coronavirus versus democracy: 5 countries where emergency powers risk abuse

National emergencies allow for the purest expressions of sovereign power, testing the government’s commitment to human rights. Some leaders are failing the coronavirus test, experts say.
Two autocrats: Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, left, and Hungarian leader Viktor Orban, right, in Budapest, Hungary, Nov. 7, 2019. AP/Presidential Press Service

So you want to be an autocrat? Here’s the 10-point checklist

Today’s autocrats rarely use brute force to wrest control. A human rights and international law scholar details the modern authoritarian's latest methods to grab and hold power.
Supporters of the anti-Islam party Pegida attend a rally in Copenhagen on January 19, 2015. Juliane Lydolph/AFP

Asylum seekers and immigrant threat: Is there a link?

The perception of an immigrant threat in Europe is often thought to be driven by rising numbers of asylum seekers, but research indicates that political and media discourses are often the driving factor.
U.S. President Donald Trump welcomes Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán to the White House on May 13, 2019. Strongmen like Orbán are increasingly gaining ground as the death knell sounds for liberal democracy. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Are we witnessing the death of liberal democracy?

Liberal democracy is in trouble, and the seeds of its demise can be found in the property rights so cherished by so-called liberals generations ago.
Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro created a new cryptocurrency called the ‘Petro’ to combat hyperinflation. Reuters/Carlos Garcia Rawlins

Is authoritarianism bad for the economy? Ask Venezuela – or Hungary or Turkey

When an elected leader turns autocratic, the economy tends to suffer. That's because, in a functioning democracy, economic policy is made jointly, with lawmakers playing a key role.
Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban addresses supporters after the parliamentary election in Budapest, Hungary, April 8, 2018. RREUTERS/Leonhard Foeger

How Viktor Orban degraded Hungary’s weak democracy

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban has transformed from a liberal into an authoritarian leader who uses the tools of democracy to attack civil society. Hungarians are protesting in the streets.

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