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Articles on Voting rights

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Poll workers, election observers and poll monitors are all on hand at voting places to ensure the 2020 election proceeds smoothly and safely. Macrovector/iStock via GettyImages

You have rights when you go to vote – and many people are there to help if there’s trouble at the polls

An army of volunteers is working at the polls and behind the scenes to ensure election 2020 runs smoothly and safely. Here's whom to turn to if things go wrong.
Voters in Nashville, Tennessee, faced long lines in March 2020. AP Photo/Mark Humphrey

The right to vote is not in the Constitution

The framers of the Constitution never mentioned a right to vote. They didn't forget. They intentionally left it out.
Not everyone who votes at home gets to do so in complete privacy. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

Voting by mail is convenient, but not always secret

Voting at home is safe from fraud and disease, but gives up a key advantage of in-person voting at official polling places: a secure, safe environment where everyone can cast their ballot secretly.
Voting is important. Make sure you know how to do it! Gregory Rec/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

How to make sure your vote counts in November

Double-check that you're registered, find out where and when you can vote, make a plan and tell your friends. Set a reminder on your calendar, and make sure you actually vote.
Georgia voters brought folding chairs, books, laptop computers and plenty of patience to the polls on June. Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Georgia’s election disaster shows how bad voting in 2020 can be

Voters across the nation should prepare for similar circumstances in their communities – but there is still time for them to demand better from their officials.
Voters in Lexington, Kentucky, waited more than 90 minutes to vote on June 23. AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley

It takes a long time to vote

Overall, waiting times may be improving – but long waits are still common in Black communities.
Gerald Dent, left, is joined by James Featherstone and Niles Ringgold at a rally for felon voting rights, in Baltimore, Maryland, on March 10, 2020. Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Stripping voting rights from felons is about politics, not punishment

Recent efforts to restore voting rights to the formerly incarcerated, a crucial Democratic constituency, could have important implications for the 2020 presidential election.
Milwaukee voters wait in a social-distancing line, some wearing masks, before voting in the state’s spring elections on April 7. AP Photo/Morry Gash

Why the Supreme Court made Wisconsin vote during the coronavirus crisis

The Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Roberts has reversed its decadeslong practice of protecting voters' rights and removing barriers to casting ballots.
Not all of Bernie Sanders’ young supporters are showing up at the polls. AP Photo/Matt Rourke

Why so few young Americans vote

Americans under 30 are far less likely to vote than older citizens. Stepping up civics instruction might help change that, a scholar explains.
Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Dwight Ball holds his granddaughter after winning the provincial election in May 2019. Young people are leaving the province for jobs and opportunities, but should still be allowed to vote in provincial elections. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

How to inject youth into Newfoundland and Labrador’s broken, greying democracy

Extending the provincial vote to expatriates from Newfoundland and Labrador could make make for a more vibrant democracy.

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