U.S. Customs officers stand beside a sign at the US/Canada border in Lansdowne, Ontario, on March 22, 2020. Lars Hagberg / AFP via Getty Images

Shuttered Canada-US border highlights different approaches to the pandemic – and differences between the 2 countries

The US and Canada have had a long, supportive relationship. But the recent closure of the US-Canada border because of the coronavirus underscores a growing divide between the two countries.
Maine’s Penobscot River flows freely where the Veazie Dam once stood. Dam removals have reopened the river to 12 native fish species. Gregory Rec/Portland Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

When dams cause more problems than they solve, removing them can pay off for people and nature

Thousands of dams across the US are aging and overdue for maintenance. Taking them down can revive rivers, restore fish runs and create new opportunities for tourism and outdoor activities.
Women protest chronically high rates of femicide – the killing of women – in Mexico City in November 2019. Pedro Pardo/AFP via Getty Images

Mexico’s other epidemic: Murdered women

In Mexico City, feminist groups spray-painted the names of Mexico's murdered women on the pavement of the Zócalo, the capital city's enormous main square, during the International Women's Day March.
Pairing widespread testing with fast, effective contact tracing is considered essential for controlling the coronavirus’s spread as the U.S. passes 100,000 deaths. AP Images/Rick Bowmer

How coronavirus contact tracing works in a state Dr. Fauci praised as a model to follow

Since the state's first coronavirus case surfaced, trained case investigators have traced the contacts of every person who tested positive. Here's what else South Carolina got right.
Artisanal small-scale gold mining polluted this stream and deforested sections of the Madre de Dios area of Peru. Mario Tama/Getty Images

Gold rush, mercury legacy: Small-scale mining for gold has produced long-lasting toxic pollution, from 1860s California to modern Peru

Small-scale gold mining operations in developing countries are major sources of toxic mercury pollution, using techniques that haven't changed much since the California Gold Rush 150 years ago.
Diligence, technological progress and a little luck have together solved a 20 year mystery of the cosmos. CSIRO/Alex Cherney

Half the matter in the universe was missing – we found it hiding in the cosmos

Cosmologists had only been able to find half the matter that should exist in the universe. With the discovery of a new astronomical phenomenon and new telescopes, researchers just found the rest.
They may look comfy to sit on but you’d plummet through and hit the ground. Sam Schooler/Unsplash

What would it feel like to touch a cloud?

You might have already felt what it would be like inside a cloud made of condensed water vapor.

Coronavirus and COVID-19

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